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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Hemiplegia


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Overview

Hemiplegia is the complete paralysis of one side of the body. It involves the arm, the leg, and sometimes the face of the affected side. A related term, hemiparesis, refers to a partial loss of motor function, and is far more common.

The main causes of hemiplegia are brain hemorrhage (hemorrhagic stroke) and diseases of the blood vessels of the cerebrum and brain stem that cause interruption of blood supply to the brain (ischemic stroke). Trauma (brain injury) is another cause of hemiplegia. Other important causes that are less acute in onset include brain tumor or lesion, brain abscess, diseases that destroy the sheath surrounding nerve cells (e.g., multiple sclerosis), blood vessel (vascular) complications of viral or bacterial infection (meningitis), and inflammation of the brain (encephalitis). When a brain lesion causes hemiplegia, the lesion is most likely on the side of the brain opposite to the paralysis. In rare cases it results from infectious disease caused by the poliovirus (poliomyelitis) or a disorder of motor nerve cells (neurons) in the spinal cord, brainstem, and motor cortex (motor system disease).

Brain stem lesions in the medulla, can cause paralysis of other parts of the body, including the tongue and sometimes the pharynx and larynx on one side and the arm and leg on the other. These are called "crossed paralyses," and are typical of brain stem lesions. A lesion in the spinal cord is rare and more often these lesions induce paralysis on both sides of the body. A paralysis that spares the face, combined with a loss of vibratory and position sense on the same side, and a loss of pain and temperature sensation on the opposite side, signifies disease of one side of the spinal cord (Brown-Séquard syndrome).

Incidence and Prevalence: Hemiplegia occurs in 88% of individuals who have suffered a stroke (Bruno). Overall incidence, which includes causes other than stroke, is difficult to predict.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor