Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Hip Dysplasia


Related Terms

  • Congenital Hip Dislocation
  • DDH
  • Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip
  • Hip Dislocation
  • Hip Subluxation

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Family Physician
  • Orthopedic (Orthopaedic) Surgeon
  • Physiatrist (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist)
  • Physical Therapist
  • Sports Medicine Physician

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Length of disability depends on the severity of the hip dysplasia, whether the condition is unilateral or bilateral, whether the condition is managed nonoperatively or operatively, the individual’s job requirements, and whether hip osteoarthritis is present concurrently.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
754.30 - Congenital Dislocation of Hip, Unilateral; Congenital Dislocation of Hip NOS
754.31 - Congenital Dislocation of Hip, Bilateral
754.32 - Congenital Subluxation of Hip, Unilateral; Congenital Flexion Deformity, Hip or Thigh; Predislocation Status of Hip at Birth; Preluxation of Hip, Congenital
754.33 - Congenital Subluxation of Hip, Bilateral
754.35 - Congenital Dislocation of One Hip with Subluxation of Other Hip

Rehabilitation

The focus of rehabilitation for hip dysplasia is to reduce direct weight-bearing forces on the hip, stretch tight musculature, strengthen surrounding hip and trunk musculature to enable a normal gait pattern, and educate individuals to modify functional activities in order to reduce pressure on the hip joint.

Stretching exercises may focus on tight inner thigh (adductor) muscles and hip flexors, while strengthening exercises typically target the gluteals, abductors, and hamstrings to increase muscular support around the painful joint. Low impact activities such as swimming and bicycling are encouraged for overall conditioning. Gait training with an assistive device (e.g., cane, crutch) may be necessary to temporarily reduce the amount of loading on the affected hip. The physical therapist instructs the individual in a comprehensive home exercise program that includes joint protection strategies and strengthening exercises to be performed within pain free range of motion.

Following osteotomy surgery for hip dysplasia, the individual may be hospitalized for 2 to 3 days, after which time inpatient rehabilitation may be necessary; the first goal of rehabilitation is independent ambulation. During recovery, the individual will need modifications and assistive devices to allow for partial weight bearing while the surgical site heals. Gait training with an assistive device will be necessary, with partial weight bearing as indicated by the physician. If, at the beginning, pain is an issue, modalities such as heat and cold may be used. The next goal is to restore motion and strength to the involved hip, following treatment protocols as determined by the surgeon. As strength returns and weight-bearing status allows, the individual transitions to performing independent functional activities without an assistive device and initiates balance and proprioception exercises. A home exercise program should be taught to complement supervised rehabilitation and to be continued after the completion of physical therapy.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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