Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Hypersomnia


Related Terms

  • Excessive Daytime Sleepiness
  • Idiopathic Hypersomnia
  • Narcolepsy
  • Sleep Apnea

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Family Physician
  • Neurologist
  • Psychiatrist
  • Pulmonologist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Factors that may influence disability include age, sex, response to treatment, severity of the condition, presence of any underlying conditions, specific job duties and accommodations available at work.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
708.5 - Cholinergic Urticaria
780.53 - Hypersomnia with Sleep Apnea, Unspecified
780.54 - Hypersomnia
780.55 - Sleep Disturbances; Disruptions of 24-hour Sleep-wake Cycle; Inversion of Sleep Rhythm; Non-24-hour Sleep-wake Rhythm

Overview

Hypersomnia is excessive, involuntary, and constant sleepiness during waking hours. An individual with hypersomnia has difficulty staying awake and has problems with motor control and concentration.

One of the main causes of hypersomnia is sleep apnea, which occurs when the back of the throat blocks the air to the lungs during sleep, causing the individual to gasp for air. The three different kinds of sleep apnea are obstructive, central, and mixed. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common form of apnea. When the collapse of the back of the throat blocks the airway, the individual gasps for air but does not fully awaken. Breathing may stop hundreds of times at night, usually for periods of 10 seconds or longer. Central sleep apnea is less common and is caused by failure of the brain to signal the muscles to breathe. This awakens the individual because oxygen levels in the blood drop abruptly. Mixed sleep apnea refers to both obstructive and central sleep apneas occurring together.

Hypersomnia is also associated with narcolepsy, which causes sleepiness during the day, usually at inappropriate times. More than half of individuals with narcolepsy may experience an abrupt loss of muscle tone and weakness (cataplexy) triggered by sudden emotion, as well as sleep paralysis in which they are momentarily unable to move or speak when they awaken. About half of individuals with narcolepsy go through dream-like states between sleep and wakefulness (hypnagogic hallucinations). Narcolepsy is caused by low levels of chemical messengers in the brain (dopamine and norepinephrine) and genetic factors.

Incidence and Prevalence: It is estimated that 80% of people with sleep apnea are not diagnosed; the condition affects about 4% of men and 2% of women (Rowley).

It is estimated that about 0.02% to 0.18% of the population suffers from narcolepsy, but the condition frequently is not diagnosed (Baker).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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