Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Influenza


Diagnosis

History: Common to almost all cases of influenza are fever and systemic symptoms, followed by upper and lower respiratory symptoms several days later. Individuals may report an abrupt onset of fever, chills, headache, muscle aches (myalgia), joint pain, cough, sore throat, runny nose, and fatigue. Some individuals may have diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. When the systemic symptoms such as chills, fever, myalgia, and fatigue subside somewhat, respiratory symptoms may become dominant as the infection progresses.

Physical exam: Upon examination, individuals may seem weary and tired. Their skin may feel warm, and they may have a fever of 101° F to 104° F (38.8° C to 40° C). A runny nose may be evident. The mucous membrane of the throat may appear reddened. Lymph nodes in the neck may be slightly swollen. Accurate diagnosis of influenza is not always possible based on symptom evaluation alone since several other viruses can cause flu-like symptoms, including adenovirus, enterovirus, and paramyxovirus. However, identifying the specific causative virus is not always done since treatment for upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) is fairly standard ("Estimates").

Tests: Diagnosis of influenza is based primarily on the medical history (symptoms) and physical examination (signs), particularly in the setting of a confirmed influenza outbreak in the community. Viral cultures of material from the nose and throat can be definitive for diagnosing influenza A and B; however, they are expensive and require 24 hours minimum for results. They generally do not influence the type of treatment provided, and are not always performed. Definitive serologic tests and immunofluorescent tests can be performed in the diagnostic laboratory, but they are labor-intensive, time-consuming, and less sensitive than cultures. Rapid tests are also available for diagnosis of influenza. These require a throat or nasal swab sample and can sometimes be helpful in determining whether a patient should receive antiviral treatment. Although test sensitivity for these rapid methods is 50% to 70%, false negatives for influenza A and B are common (“Rapid Diagnostic”). For these reasons, during a local outbreak of influenza, the diagnosis is most often made based on symptoms and physical examination alone.

Arterial blood gases (ABG) may be performed in hospitalized individuals whose breathing is compromised or whose oxygen level is low when monitored. Lumbar puncture may be done to rule out possible meningitis suggested by physical exam findings.

A chest x-ray may be indicated in individuals who are at high-risk of developing pneumonia, including individuals with COPD, the elderly, and the immunosuppressed, or in the individual with abnormalities detected on physical exam.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor