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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Inhalation Burns


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Overview

Inhalation burns can be caused by smoke, hydrofluoric acid, ammonia, chlorine, or other chemical agents after an individual inhales these toxic substances. Cyanide (CN) toxicity can come from exposure to the toxic debris of burning polyurethane, wool, or silk items. Upper airway edema, respiratory distress, and carbon monoxide (CO) toxicity are the hallmarks of injury from inhalation. These symptoms appear within 12 to 24 hours following the occurrence of the burn. Also, a rare condition may occur in which chemical toxicity or the heat from fire oxidizes lung hemoglobin, resulting in impaired oxygen transport (methemoglobinemia) and respiratory distress. Inhalation injury is more likely to occur in fires in enclosed areas.

There are usually three phases for significant inhalation injuries. The first phase is marked by upper airway swelling and blockage, lower airway spasm, and effects of carbon monoxide poisoning. The second stage occurs after 3 to 4 days and consists of decreased oxygen levels and congestion within the lung tissue (diffuse lung infiltrates). The last phase starts about 3 to 10 days after the injury and consists of bronchitis and pneumonia. The focus of treatment differs from phase to phase.

Incidence and Prevalence: Among individuals in the US with burns over 5% of their total body surface area (TBSA), less than 10% have inhalation injuries; among those with burns over 85% of their TBSA, over 80% have inhalation injuries (Lafferty). In 2003, over 145,000 chemical burns were reported to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, of which 370 cases resulted in major chemical toxicity and 9,368 resulted in moderate chemical toxicity (Cox).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor