Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Intravenous Therapy


Specialists

  • Emergency Medicine Physician
  • General Surgeon
  • Internal Medicine Physician

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

The length of disability is dependent on the underlying condition.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
99.1 - Intravenous Therapy
99.10 - Injection or Infusion of Thrombolytic Agent; Alteplase; Anistreplase; Reteplase; Streptokinase; Tissue Plasminogen Activator (TPA); Urokinase
99.11 - Injection of Rh Immune Globulin; Injection of Anti-D (Rhesus) Globulin; RhoGAM
99.12 - Immunization for Allergy; Desensitization
99.13 - Immunization for Autoimmune Disease
99.14 - Injection or Infusion of Immunoglobulin; Injection of Immune Sera; Injection or Infusion of Gamma Globulin
99.15 - Parenteral Infusion of Concentrated Nutritional Substances; Hyperalimentation; Total Parenteral Nutrition [TPN]; Peripheral Parenteral Nutrition [PPN]
99.16 - Injection of antidote; Injection of: Antivenin, Heavy Metal Antagonist
99.17 - Injection of Insulin
99.18 - Injection or Infusion of Electrolytes
99.19 - Injection of Anticoagulant
99.2 - Injection or Infusion of Other Therapeutic or Prophylactic Substance
99.20 - Injection or Infusion of Platelet Inhibitor; Glycoprotein IIB/IIIa Inhibitor; GP IIB/IIIa Inhibitor; GP IIB-IIIa Inhibitor
99.21 - Injection of Antibiotic
99.22 - Injection of Other Anti-infective
99.23 - Injection of Steroid; Injection of Cortisone; Subdermal Implantation of Progesterone
99.24 - Injection of Other Hormone
99.25 - Injection of Infusion of Cancer Chemotherapeutic Substance; Chemoembolization; Injection of Infusion of Antineoplastic Agent
99.26 - Injection of Tranquilizer
99.27 - Iontophoresis
99.28 - Injection or Infusion of Biological Response Modifier [BRM] as an Antineoplastic Agent; Low-dose Interleukin-2 (IL-2) Therapy; Immunotherapy, Antineoplastic; Interleukin Therapy; Tumor Vaccine
99.29 - Injection or Infusion of Other therapeutic or Prophylactic Substance

Reason for Procedure

Intravenous (IV) therapy helps maintain or restore the fluid volume and electrolyte balance of the body, infuse medications, transfuse blood or blood components, and administer high-calorie solutions that provide nutritional support (total parenteral nutrition, or TPN). IV therapy is commonly used to maintain fluid volume in individuals who are not allowed to eat or drink before or after medical or surgical procedures or to restore the fluid volume level in individuals who are severely dehydrated (such as through vomiting or other illness). IV therapy is also used to administer certain drugs that cannot be taken by mouth because they will be destroyed by gastric juices, are irritating, or cannot be absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract. Commonly infused medications include those used to fight infection (antibiotics), to dissolve blood clots (thrombolytics), and to prevent blood clots (anticoagulants). Anticancer medications (chemotherapy), heart and blood pressure medications, anticonvulsants, and pain medications can also be administered intravenously. IV therapy also replaces blood (or plasma) lost in an accident or during an operation. Nutritional supplements and electrolyte replacements may be given through infusion to maintain body fluids in individuals who are unable to eat or drink. Some types of catheters can also be used to withdraw blood for laboratory tests.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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