Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Laminectomy or Laminotomy


Related Terms

  • Foraminotomy
  • Lumbar Laminectomy
  • Rachiotomy
  • Spondylotomy

Specialists

  • Neurosurgeon
  • Orthopedic (Orthopaedic) Surgeon

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Factors that may influence length of disability include the extent of the laminectomy or laminotomy procedure; surgical site within the spinal column; underlying cause of the disorder and its severity; procedures performed concurrently with laminectomy, such as discectomy or fusion; occurrence of complications; individual's job requirements; individual's ability to modify work activities; and individual's compliance with treatment and rehabilitation.

The duration of disability is highly variable, depending on whether the root compression is cervical, thoracic, lumbar, or sacral; whether the disorder involves the spinal cord; and whether the individual's job classification is sedentary, light, medium, heavy, or very heavy work. Duration assumes no persisting spinal cord or cauda equina deficit.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
03.02 - Reopening of Laminectomy Site
03.09 - Exploration and Decompression of Spinal Canal, Other: Decompression: Laminectomy or Laminotomy; Expansile Laminoplasty; Exploration of Spinal Nerve Root; Foraminotomy

Complications

A common complication of the laminectomy and laminotomy procedures is some degree of neck or back pain. Relief may be obtained with painkilling injections or medication.

Infection of the wound is uncommon and can usually be treated with antibiotics. Surgery is sometimes required to treat severe infections with abscess formation by allowing them to drain. Antibiotics are routinely given pre-operatively to help prevent postsurgical infection. Other complications with any type of surgery include uncontrolled bleeding that requires blood transfusions, injury to blood vessels, or injury to neighboring structures.

Dural tear and cerebrospinal fluid leak may occur with surgery, particularly in cases where there has been a previous surgery. If the nerve covering (dura) is torn, leakage of spinal fluid may lead to headache or infection. A dural tear may be managed intraoperatively with repair of the tear or may require management postoperatively with drainage.

Neurologic injury may also occur if the spinal cord and spinal roots (exposed during the surgery) are damaged. Fortunately, these complications are rare. This kind of damage in the thoracic and cervical region may cause numbness, paralysis of the upper and/or lower extremities based on the location, difficulties walking or moving around (ambulation), or impaired bowel/bladder function.

As with any surgery requiring general anesthesia, complications of anesthesia may include allergic reaction, irregular heart rate (cardiac arrhythmia), a drop in blood pressure (hypotension), muscular rigidity, and severe and sometimes fatal temperature elevation (malignant hyperthermia). Because the individual lies face down during the procedure, when the bone is cut there is an increased risk of air embolism, in which air can enter a vessel and travel to a smaller blood vessel. This can cause blockage and stroke or loss of blood flow to the organ supplied by the affected vessel.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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