Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Lumbar Disc Disorder with Cauda Equina Syndrome


Related Terms

  • Lumbar Disc Displacement with Myelopathy
  • Lumbar Spinal Cord Compression

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
722.73 - Lumbar Disc Disorder with Myelopathy
724.9 - Other Unspecified Back Disorders; Ankylosis of Spine NOS; Compression of Spinal Nerve Root NEC; Spinal Disorder NOS

Overview

Lumbar disc disorder with myelopathy refers to a disorder of the lumbar spine that results in compression of the lowest portion of the spinal cord (conus medullaris). Myelopathy is an inclusive term referring to any disorder of the spinal cord. The lumbar region specifies the lower portion of the spine from the mid- to lower back between the thoracic spine of the upper back and sacral region at the base of the spine. The lumbar spine contains five vertebrae (L1-L5).

Examples of myelopathy include: carcinomatous myelopathy (spinal cord degeneration associated with cancer); compressive myelopathy (spinal cord changes from the pressure of hematomas, stenosis [narrowing], or masses); radiation myelopathy (spinal cord destruction from radiation sources such as x-ray therapy). When spinal cord destruction is caused by a complication of disease, the specific myelopathy signifies that origin. (e.g., diabetic myelopathy).

Lumbar disc disorders most commonly include lumbar disc disease (a chronic, degenerative condition of the cushion-like discs between the lumbar vertebrae) and disc displacement (an abnormal protrusion or herniation of a disc that separates the vertebrae in the lower back or lumbar area of the spine). The most common areas of disc herniation are between L4 and L5 and between L5 and the first sacral vertebra (S1). Since the spinal cord ends in the middle back at L1 or at the L1-L2 vertebrae (varies), only herniations of L1-L2 discs can cause spinal cord compression or myelopathy. Disc disorders with myelopathy occurring between lumbar vertebrae L3 to L5 are rare. Herniations of L2-L3 through L5-S1 can cause radiculopathy (compression of one spinal nerve root) or cauda equina syndrome (many spinal nerve roots compressed).

For L1-L2 herniations with myelopathy, please refer to Thoracic Disc Disorder with Myelopathy, since L1-L2 herniations behave like lower thoracic herniations. For L2-L3 through L5-S1 herniations, please refer to the topic Displacement, Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Without Myelopathy.

Incidence and Prevalence: The estimated lifetime incidence of lower back pain is 60-90% with annual incidence estimated at 5% (Patel). The precise incidence of lumbar disc degeneration and disc displacement with myelopathy is unknown. However, the National Center for Health Statistics reports that low back pain accounts for 13 million visits to doctors each year, with 14.3% of all new doctor visits attributed to lower back pain; it is also the most frequent reason given for lost productivity in the US (Patel).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Causation and Known Risk Factors

The most common risk factor for lumbar disc disorder with myelopathy disc is age-related disc degeneration in the presence of stenosis. Other risk factors include obesity, diabetes, and cigarette smoking. Genetic predisposition has also been suggested as a cause (Patel).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



References

Cited

Patel, Rajeev K., and Curtis W. Slipman. "Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease." eMedicine. Eds. J. Michael Wieting, et al. 18 Jan. 2007. Medscape. 23 Mar. 2009 <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/309767-overview>.

General

Berger, Joseph, and Stephen Ryan. "Medical Myelopathies." The Spine. Eds. H. N. Herkowitz, et al. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, 1999. 1413-1428.

Williams, Keith D., and Ashley L. Park. "Lumbar Disc Disease." Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics. Eds. S. Terry Canale and James H. Beaty. 11th ed. Philadelphia: Mosby Elsevier, 2008. 2199-2216. MD Consult. Elsevier, Inc. 19 Jan. 2009 <http://home.mdconsult.com>.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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