Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Bladder Neck Suspension


Related Terms

  • Marshall-Marchetti Operation
  • Marshall-Marchetti-Krantz Procedure
  • Retropubic Urethropexy
  • Vesicourethropexy

Specialists

  • Gynecologist
  • Urologist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Factors that influence the length of disability include any postsurgery complications such as infection, hemorrhage, urinary retention, chronic inflammation, and pain of the pubic bone area (pubic symphysis).

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
59.5 - Retropubic Urethral Suspension; Burch Procedure; Marshall-Marchetti-Krantz Operation; Suture of Periurethral Tissue to Symphysis Pubis; Urethra Suspension NOS

Ability to Work (Return to Work Considerations)

Recovery is somewhat longer for open abdominal surgery than for laparoscopic surgery. The individual may gradually return to normal activities, but heavy lifting and strenuous exercise are prohibited for 1 to 3 weeks after surgery, with a gradual increase thereafter. Normal activities may be resumed in about 6 weeks. Development of complications such as infection may increase recovery time. Some individuals go home with a catheter remaining in the bladder and attached to a leg bag. A longer recovery period may be needed for these individuals, or if the individual returns to work with a catheter, work restrictions and accommodations may be needed to provide care to the catheter. Company policy on post-surgery medication usage should be reviewed to determine if pain medication use is compatible with job safety and function.

Risk: There is no short term risk to working after bladder neck suspension other than what is necessary for compliance with postsurgical restrictions to ensure adequate healing. Individuals with poor long term outcome, may not be able to participate in heavy lifting. For more information on risk, capacity, and tolerance, refer to "Work Ability and Return to Work," page 378-380.

Capacity: Capacity may be temporarily reduced in accordance with restrictions to avoid strenuous physical exertion that may increase abdominal pressure. Individuals may require recovery time to regain pelvic floor muscle control and continence; during this period, individuals may need ready bathroom access. Rarely, individuals with poor long term outcomes are restricted from heavy or very heavy work.

Tolerance: Tolerance factors include incision-related pain and residual incontinence. Once recovery is complete, no disability is anticipated.

Accommodations: The work place can be made more accommodating by providing easy access to bathroom facilities during recovery.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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