Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA)


Related Terms

  • S. aureus
  • Staph Infections
  • Staphylococcal Infections
  • Staphylococcus aureus

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Cardiologist, Cardiovascular Physician
  • Infectious Disease Internist
  • Internal Medicine Physician
  • Nephrologist
  • Pulmonologist
  • Urologist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

The source and extent of the infection, age and health status of the individual, immune status, timeliness of treatment after MRSA is diagnosed, and response to treatment, will influence duration. The development of complications, especially toxic shock syndrome or organ failure, may increase length of disability. The need to surgically remove and replace implanted devices or prostheses may extend hospitalization, recovery time, and length of disability.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
041.11 - Methicillin Susceptible Staphylococcus Aureus; MSSA; Staphylococcus aureus NOS
041.12 - Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA)
V02.53 - Carrier or Suspected Carrier of Infectious Diseases; Methicillin Susceptible Staphylococcus Aureus
V02.54 - Carrier or Suspected Carrier of Infectious Diseases; Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus

Prognosis

The prognosis for MRSA infection varies depending on the extent of the infection, the health status of the individual, and whether an appropriate antibiotic treatment is found before the infection overwhelms the immune system. Individuals in relatively good health before MRSA infection usually recover. In other individuals, the earlier treatment is begun, the better the prognosis. The mortality for MRSA is greater than that for HIV infection, accounting for 19,000 deaths a year in the US; about 86% of deaths are due to HA-MRSA, and 14% are due to CA-MRSA (Davis). Pneumonia and septicemia are the most frequent causes of death from MRSA infection and carry a mortality rate of about 20% (Davis). More than 80% of S. aureus bacteremia that goes untreated results in death, and the mortality rate for staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome is 3% to 5% in those who develop this complication (Herchline).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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