Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Multiple Myeloma


Related Terms

  • Multiple Myelomatosis
  • Plasma Cell Myeloma

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Cardiologist, Cardiovascular Physician
  • General Surgeon
  • Hematologist
  • Nephrologist
  • Oncologist
  • Orthopedic (Orthopaedic) Surgeon
  • Radiology Oncologist

Comorbid Conditions

  • Blood diseases
  • Diabetes
  • Immune disorders
  • Systemic infection

Factors Influencing Duration

Length of disability is determined by the severity of symptoms, stage of disease, advanced age, complications of the disease, and response to treatment.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
203.00 - Multiple Myeloma without Mention of Having Achieved Remission; Failed Remission
203.01 - Multiple Myeloma; Kahlers Disease, Myelomatosis; in Remission
203.02 - Multiple myeloma, in relapse

Diagnosis

History: Individuals may report pain in their bones especially the back (spinal vertebrae), hips or pelvis, ribs, and skull. If the vertebrae are affected, they may collapse and compress nerves, causing numbness or paralysis. Individuals may have a history of recurrent bacterial infections. A report of increased fatigue and shortness of breath upon exertion may indicate anemia. Nausea, confusion, frequent urination (polyuria), and constipation may be present due to an increased circulating calcium level (hypercalcemia) or because of pending renal failure.

Physical exam: A complete physical exam may reveal pallor, tenderness with pressure over an involved bone, and, in rare instances, soft tissue masses. Cardiac examination can show an abnormal heartbeat related to anemia, excessive amount of potassium in the blood (hyperkalemia), or amyloid heart disease. Neurologic exam may give evidence of nerve disorder (neuropathy) or spinal cord compression. Carpal tunnel syndrome may be present in the wrist. Enlargement of the liver or spleen may be noted on palpation of the abdomen.

Tests: A complete blood count (CBC) will typically indicate decreased red blood cells (anemia), hemoglobin, and cell volume. An erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) may be done, with increases indicating inflammation or infection.

Blood chemistry tests will identify excess protein in the form of free light chain portions of immunoglobulins or monoclonal immunoglobulins (levels of IgG or IgA), and abnormally high levels of calcium (hypercalcemia) indicating bone breakdown. Free immunoglobulin fractions (light chains) can also be detected in the urine as Bence Jones protein. Quantitative methods for measuring increases or decreases in the production of free light chains or immunoglobulins in serum or urine are helpful to both diagnose and monitor individuals with multiple myeloma. Serum electrophoresis identifies the specific overproduced immunoglobulins.

A DNA microarray technique can be used to study gene profiles and help identify the type of cells and antibodies that are proliferating. A bone marrow aspiration and biopsy will show increased numbers of plasma cells at varying stages of maturity; sheets or stacks of plasma cells will be seen microscopically. Chromosome studies may reveal acquired chromosome abnormalities that may help determine the individual's prognosis.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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