Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Myalgia and Myositis


Related Terms

  • Muscle Ache
  • Muscle Pain

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Dentist
  • Internal Medicine Physician
  • Neurologist
  • Orthopedic (Orthopaedic) Surgeon
  • Physiatrist (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist)
  • Rheumatologist

Comorbid Conditions

  • Alcoholism
  • Chronic disease
  • Drug abuse
  • Immune system disorders
  • Kidney disease
  • Liver disease
  • Malnutrition
  • Muscle wasting

Factors Influencing Duration

Although they are two distinct conditions, myalgia and myositis may initially produce similar effects. However, with myositis, the individual's response to treatment and symptom progression merits close attention. Depending on what has caused the condition, some individuals may not be able to return to work as quickly as others. Disability depends on the underlying disorder, the individual's response to treatment, and the type of work duties involved.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
729.1 - Myalgia and Myositis, Unspecified; Fibromyositis NOS; Fibromyalgia

Overview

Myalgia refers to muscle pain. The pain may be localized, as in a muscle strain or crush injury, or generalized pain caused by an underlying disease such as a viral infection. The most common type of localized muscle pain is caused by muscle overuse or injury from strenuous activity.

Myositis refers to muscle inflammation. Myositis can lead to muscle pain, swelling, and weakness. Temporary myositis may be caused by over exercise or injury to the muscles, and chronic forms can develop from viral and bacterial infections, medications, certain diseases, and autoimmune disorders. Both myalgia and myositis are symptoms of underlying conditions. Effective relief of myalgia and myositis requires diagnosis and treatment of the underlying condition causing these symptoms.

Diseases that may cause myalgia or myositis include viruses such as HIV, influenza, Epstein-Barr, herpes simplex, or poliomyelitis (Enterovirus), and connective tissue diseases (collagen vascular diseases), including autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, fibromyalgia, and polymyalgia. Myalgia may be associated with the involuntary muscle movement (spasticity) of central nervous system disorders such as multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and spinal cord injuries. Muscle pain also can accompany the rigidity associated with Parkinson's disease and myofascial pain syndrome.

Bacterial infections such as strep throat (Streptococcus), Lyme disease, and tetanus may be accompanied by myalgia or myositis. Fungi that cause histoplasmosis and parasites associated with malaria, toxoplasmosis, and trichinosis also can create symptoms that include myalgia and myositis. Muscle pain and inflammation may result from reactions to vaccinations (immunizations) or medications (e.g., anticonvulsants, antibiotics, anticancer agents, cholesterol-lowering agents, diuretics); abuse of substances such as alcohol, amphetamines, cocaine, or narcotics; poisons such as strychnine and snake, insect, or spider bites; and exposure to toxic chemicals and environmental factors such as ultraviolet light. Deficiencies in B-complex vitamins and vitamin C, mineral deficiencies, and electrolyte imbalances involving calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, or sodium, can cause myalgia. The condition also can result from certain endocrine and metabolic disorders such as hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, Addison's disease, hypoparathyroidism, diabetes mellitus, metastatic neoplasm, and diabetic neuropathy. Eosinophilia-myalgia with accompanying severe or chronic muscle pain can be an acute reaction to the ingestion of a contaminated dietary supplement known as L-tryptophan.

Other conditions in which myalgia and/or myositis may be present include sarcoidosis, compartment syndrome, certain inherited metabolic disorders, and muscle pain with no apparent physical basis (psychogenic myalgia). Individuals diagnosed with myositis may have underlying conditions such as pneumonia or other lung diseases.

Incidence and Prevalence: Since myalgia and myositis are symptoms rather than disorders, their specific incidence is unknown.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






Feedback
Send us comments, suggestions, corrections, or anything you would like us to hear. If you are not logged in, you must include your email address, in order for us to respond. We cannot, unfortunately, respond to every comment. If you are seeking medical advice, please contact your physician. Thank you!
Send this comment to:
Sales Customer Support Content Development
 
This publication is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. It is published with the understanding that the author, editors, and publisher are not engaged in rendering medical, legal, accounting or other professional service. If medical, legal, or other expert assistance is required, the service of a competent professional should be sought. We are unable to respond to requests for advice. Any Sales inquiries should include an email address or other means of communication.