Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Nephrotic Syndrome


Related Terms

  • Proteinuria

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Cardiovascular Internist
  • Endocrinologist
  • Hematologist
  • Immunologist
  • Infectious Disease Internist
  • Medical Toxicologist
  • Nephrologist
  • Oncologist
  • Pharmacologist

Comorbid Conditions

  • Cancer
  • Chronic hepatitis
  • Collagen vascular diseases
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Immune system disorders
  • Malnutrition
  • Obesity

Factors Influencing Duration

Disability may be influenced by the severity and extent of disease, the underlying cause, the response to therapy, and the presence of complications.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
581 - Nephrotic Syndrome
581.0 - Nephrotic Syndrome with Lesion of Proliferative Glomerulonephritis
581.1 - Nephrotic Syndrome with Lesion of Membranous Glomerulonephritis
581.2 - Nephrotic Syndrome with Lesion of Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis
581.3 - Nephrotic Syndrome with Lesion of Minimal Change Glomerulonephritis
581.8 - Nephrotic Syndrome with Other Specified Pathological Lesion in Kidney
581.81 - Nephrotic syndrome in diseases classified elsewhere
581.89 - Nephrotic Syndrome with Other Specified Pathological Lesion in Kidney, Other; Exudative Nephritis; Interstitial (Diffuse) (Focal) Nephritis
581.9 - Nephrotic Syndrome with Unspecified Pathological Lesion in Kidney; Glomerulonephritis with Edema; Nephrosis; Renal Disease with Edema

Diagnosis

History: Symptoms include persistent, worsening swelling (edema). In the early stages, edema might be most noticeable in the legs and feet after standing for long periods. It may also be quite noticeable around the eyes when the individual first wakes up (dependent position). Later, edema may be constantly present. A bloated or tight feeling in the abdomen may be present as a result of fluid buildup in the abdomen (ascites). Individuals may also complain of shortness of breath or loss of appetite. Other symptoms include blood in the urine, change in urinary frequency or viscosity, and the appearance of foam in the toilet after urinating (caused by the high protein content of the urine). Some individuals also report weight gain related to fluid retention.

Physical exam: The exam may reveal marked edema in the legs and face. Exertion may cause shortness of breath (dyspnea) due to fluid retention in the chest (pleural effusion, pulmonary edema). High blood pressure (hypertension) is often noted, but the blood pressure may fall abnormally when the individual sits or stands up after lying down (orthostatic hypotension). The skin may have a streaked or banded appearance (striae), and the fingernails may develop white lines. Eye examination with an ophthalmoscope (funduscopic examination) often reveals abnormally shiny retinae.

Tests: The physician usually orders a standard urinalysis as well as a 24-hour urine collection. The standard urinalysis shows abnormal levels of protein, sugar (glucose), blood, amino acids, fats, potassium, and sodium, and the urine may appear foamy. Microscopic examination of the urine may reveal clumps of cells. Kidney (renal) function can be determined by evaluation of a 24-hour urine collection. Blood tests show decreased levels of albumin (hypoalbuminemia), excessive fat (hyperlipidemia) and high cholesterol (hypercholesterolemia). Other blood chemistries (sodium, calcium, potassium) may be abnormal.

In cases in which the suspected cause is primary kidney disease, a sample of kidney tissue may be removed for microscopic examination (kidney biopsy), which helps determine the type of kidney disease and the extent of kidney damage.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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