Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Obesity


Related Terms

  • Adiposity
  • Corpulence
  • Fatness
  • Overweight

Differential Diagnosis

  • Cushing's syndrome
  • Deficiency in thyroid activity (hypothyroidism)
  • Genetic disorders (e.g., Down syndrome)
  • Severe familial high cholesterol (hyperlipidemia)
  • Severe familial obesity
  • Tumors of the adrenal or pituitary gland

Specialists

  • Clinical Psychologist
  • Endocrinologist
  • General Surgeon
  • Internal Medicine Physician
  • Neurologist
  • Psychiatrist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Factors that may influence length of disability include type of job and compliance with treatment protocol.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
278.00 - Obesity, Unspecified
278.01 - Obesity, Morbid
278.02 - Overweight

Overview

Obesity is a state of excessive accumulation of fat in the body. Obesity predisposes the individual to an increased risk of diseases (morbidity) and death (mortality).

One common standard to define overweight and obesity is the body mass index (BMI), which is derived by dividing an individual's weight in kilograms by his or her height in meters squared (BMI = kg/m2). Multiplying an individual's weight in pounds by 704 and then dividing it twice by the individual's height in inches can also compute BMI. Individuals with a BMI of 25.0 to 29.9 are considered overweight; those with BMI greater than or equal to 30.0 kg/m2 are classified as obese; and individuals with a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 have severe (morbid) obesity ("Prevalence"). Other more sophisticated methods to measure body fat such as underwater weighing, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), body average density measurement, and bioelectrical impedance analysis, are expensive, not readily available, require accurate calibration, and are primarily used for epidemiological studies.

Simple obesity differs from morbid obesity. Morbidly obese individuals have a body weight that is 2, 3, or more times the ideal weight and that begins to interfere with normal physiological functions, such as breathing.

Incidence and Prevalence: The prevalence of obesity has risen dramatically over the past several decades and continues to rise: in the US, obesity rates increased 1.7% between 2005 and 2007 (Galuska). Overall, 25.6% of the general population is obese (Galuska), and 67% of the population is either overweight or obese ("Prevalence").

Since 1980, the number of obese people worldwide has almost doubled. It is estimated that in 2008 more than 1.4 billion adults aged 20 or older were overweight and of these, more than 200 million men and nearly 300 million women were obese. In 2008, 35% of adults aged 20 and older were overweight, and 11% were obese. ("Obesity and Overweight").

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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