Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Open Wound


Treatment

The primary goal of open wound management is to restore optimal function to the involved area by prompt and thorough repair of injured tissue and to minimize the risk of infection and deformity. Initial treatment consists of controlling the bleeding, treating for shock if necessary, and thoroughly cleansing the wound to reduce the risk of infection. Administration of local or regional anesthesia may be necessary in order to evaluate a wound, control bleeding (hemostasis), and thoroughly cleanse the area by high-pressure irrigation with saline before repair can begin.

After bleeding is controlled and the individual is stabilized, wound care can be initiated. The treatment approach is the same whether the wound involves the hand, finger, leg, knee, or foot. Any open wound extending into deep surrounding structures such as bone, blood vessels, or nerves requires surgical intervention. Open wounds associated with a fracture of nearby bones (open fractures) require urgent surgery (reduction and internal fixation of open fracture) to stabilize the fracture and close the wound. Open wounds extending to tendons, nerves, and major blood vessels near joints and bones of the hand, feet, and ankle typically require prompt surgical repair (repair and / or reconstruction of tendon, nerve, or vessel). Amputations and some avulsion wounds usually require urgent plastic surgery to reattach amputated parts (reimplantation). Grafting of skin on wounds with large amounts of skin and tissue loss (avulsion wounds) can take place at the time of injury or a few days later. In some circumstances, severe wounds to the hands or feet may necessitate amputation of any tissue that has severely compromised circulation and cannot be salvaged.

Treatment of less extensive abrasions, lacerations, and puncture wounds begins with control of bleeding. This is followed by cleansing the wound thoroughly using high-pressure irrigation (syringe or water pik) with saline or mild antiseptic solution (Fernandez). Any remaining foreign matter is removed, and the ragged or unhealthy tissue is débrided. Most wounds are then closed using stitches, tissue adhesive, surgical tape (steri-strips), staples, or a combination of these methods.

Wounds with a high risk of infection (puncture wounds to the foot, human and animal bites) or wounds 12 to 24 hours old are left open and then closed with stitches, if needed, in 5 to 7 days (delayed primary closure). This allows time for control of any potential infection by treatment with antibiotics. In larger wounds more than 24 hours old, the area is cleansed, débrided, and then packed with wet to dry dressings. The wound is then either allowed to heal naturally (healing by secondary intention), or it may be closed surgically in 5 to 7 days.

Repaired wounds are covered with an antibiotic ointment and appropriate bandage. A tetanus shot (tetanus toxoid) may be given if 7 to 10 years have passed since the individual's last booster shot, or if there is a question about when the individual was last vaccinated. If the individual has never been immunized against tetanus, human tetanus immune globulin may be given in addition to tetanus toxoid.

Wounds that extend over bending joints, such as the fingers, hand, or ankle, are sometimes splinted to immobilize the area and help prevent pulling on the wound edges. Wounds should be checked for signs of infection daily; infection usually develops within the first 48 hours after injury. Oral antibiotics may be prescribed to treat or prevent infection (Gosselin).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor