Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Organic Psychosis


Related Terms

  • Delirium
  • Dementia
  • Metabolic Encephalopathy
  • Organic Brain Syndrome
  • Organic Brain Syndrome with Psychotic Features
  • Organic Mental Syndrome
  • Senile Organic Psychosis

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Clinical Psychologist
  • Endocrinologist
  • Internal Medicine Physician
  • Neurologist
  • Psychiatrist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Discovery of an underlying, treatable cause may lead to improvement or recovery.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
290.9 - Senile Psychotic Condition, Unspecified
291.0 - Alcohol Withdrawal Delirium; Alcoholic Delirium; Delirium Tremens
291.2 - Alcoholic Dementia, Other
291.3 - Alcohol-induced Psychotic Disorder with Hallucinations; Alcoholic Hallucinosis (Acute), Psychosis with Hallucinosis
291.4 - Alcohol Intoxication, Idiosyncratic; Pathologic Alcohol Intoxication, Drunkenness
291.9 - Alcoholic Psychosis, Unspecified
292.11 - Drug-induced Psychotic Disorder with Delusions; Paranoid State Induced by Drugs
292.12 - Drug-induced Psychotic Disorder with Hallucinations; Hallucinatory State Induced by Drugs
293.9 - Transient Mental Disorder in Conditions Classified Elsewhere, Unspecified; Organic Psychosis, Infective NOS, Posttraumatic NOS, Transient NOS; Psycho-organic Syndrome
294.0 - Amnestic Disorder in Conditions Classified Elsewhere; Korsakoffs Psychosis or Syndrome, Nonalcoholic
294.9 - Persistent Mental Disorders Due to Conditions Classified Elsewhere, Unspecified; Cognitive Disorder NOS; Organic Psychosis, Chronic

Overview

Organic psychosis, formerly known as organic brain syndrome, refers to a wide group of psychological and behavioral abnormalities thought to be secondary to a disturbance in brain structure or function, although the specific cause is unknown. These abnormalities in brain function may be temporary or permanent. An organic cause is suspected when there is no indication of a clearly defined psychiatric or "inorganic" cause such as a mood disorder. However, as more is understood about derangement in the brain chemistry underlying psychiatric disorders, the distinction between organic and inorganic processes has become increasingly unclear.

Now the DSM-IV-TR (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision) has broken up the diagnoses that once fell under the diagnostic category organic mental disorder into three categories: delirium, dementia, and amnestic and other cognitive disorders; mental disorders due to a general medical condition; and substance-related disorders. This change was made because the descriptive word organic gives the false impression that conditions that are not organic have no biological explanation. An example of a mental disorder due to a general medical condition is major depression caused by hypothyroidism. An example of substance-related disorder is psychosis secondary to drug abuse.

Incidence and Prevalence: Delirium has a prevalence of 0.4% in those aged 18 and above; at age 55 and older, the prevalence increases to 1.1% (DSM-IV-TR 138).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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