Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Pain, Chronic


Related Terms

  • Chronic Pain Syndrome
  • Unresolved Pain

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Anesthesiologist
  • Clinical Psychologist
  • Dentist
  • Neurologist
  • Pain Medicine Physician/Pain Specialist
  • Physiatrist (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist)
  • Psychiatrist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Although persons with chronic pain syndrome may have no objective medical impairment, their self-perception of incapacity depends on many variables, including character traits, personality, ethnic and cultural background, the presence of support systems, motivation and prior job satisfaction.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
338.2 - Chronic Pain
338.21 - Chronic Pain Due to Trauma
338.22 - Chronic Post-thoracotomy Pain
338.28 - Chronic Postoperative Pain, Other
338.29 - Chronic Pain, Other
338.3 - Neoplasm Related Pain (Acute) (Chronic)
338.4 - Chronic Pain Syndrome; Chronic Pain Associated with Significant Psychosocial Dysfunction

Diagnosis

History: Individuals with chronic pain syndrome describe persistent pain with subjective symptoms disproportionate to their objective findings. Individuals with chronic pain syndrome often have a history of prescription or non-prescription drug abuse, alcohol abuse, treatment by multiple medical professionals, extensive diagnostic testing and treatment, psychological disorders, and self-limitations in personal and occupational activities of daily living. A thorough history will include assessment of major organ systems, including musculoskeletal, reproductive, gastrointestinal, and urologic systems. The use of standardized questionnaires can be very helpful in gathering information about the location, quality, and severity of pain, as well as its effects on sleep and on the individual’s level of function. Risk assessment questionnaires are used as a part of history to verify the psychological and dependency risks in setting of pain management. Physicians may assess the individual for Sternbach’s 6 D’s of CPS (dramatization of complaints, drug misuse, dysfunction, dependency, depression, and disability) to establish the diagnosis.

Physical exam: Individuals with chronic pain syndrome can have normal physical examinations with no evidence of neurologic, musculoskeletal, or other impairment. Individuals with chronic pain syndrome usually exhibit expressions of pain, such as moaning, groaning, gasping, or grimacing, that are inconsistent with the absence of medical impairment. Individuals with this syndrome often exhibit so-called non-organic findings, such as little or no active range of motion but normal passive range of motion.

Tests: Individuals with chronic pain syndrome may have no abnormalities identified on diagnostic testing. However, routine blood tests and neurologic evaluation may be ordered to investigate possible underlying conditions. Psychological testing may be done, particularly if organic diseases have been excluded. A chronic pain patient should be thoroughly and periodically investigated as should any other patient. Explaining all current and future conditions of a patient by only one diagnosis of chronic pain syndrome may be misleading and dangerous.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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