Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Paralysis, Paraplegia, and Quadriplegia


Prognosis

Paralysis

Paralysis from spinal cord injury may be temporary, and partial function may be regained as the swelling subsides. Improvement can begin as early as 3 weeks after the initial injury, and after 1 year, the level of functioning usually stabilizes at one to two levels below the injury site. Surgery to remove tumors in the spinal cord can relieve pain and pressure and improve neurological deficits.

Paraplegia

Decompression of the spinal cord or nerve roots and spinal stabilization may result in improvement in pain, neurological deficits, and the individual's ability to walk. Identification of the individual's symptoms allows for appropriate surgical intervention. Recent evidence suggests that the life expectancy of those with spinal cord injuries is improving. Regardless of total life expectancy, individuals with permanent spinal cord injury are at risk for complications and recurrent health problems. Those with paraplegia usually become more independent over time, resulting in a higher life expectancy than quadriplegics. The prescription of treatment systems, including mobile standing devices and orthoses to enable individuals with spinal lesions to walk, is widely practiced and can provide relief from secondary medical complications and improvement in quality of life. Individuals with hereditary spastic paraplegia may have a normal life expectancy; the severity of symptoms varies among those affected (Paik).

Quadriplegia

Decompression of the spinal cord or nerve roots and spinal stabilization may result in improvement in pain, neurological deficits, and the individual’s ability to walk. Identification of the individual's symptoms allows for appropriate surgical intervention with favorable results. Recent evidence suggests that the life expectancy of those with spinal cord injuries is improving, but those with quadriplegia generally have a lower life expectancy. Regardless of total life expectancy, individuals can expect to have recurrent health problems due to their quadriplegia. The prescription of treatment systems, including mobile standing devices and orthoses to enable individuals with spinal lesions to walk, is widely practiced and can provide relief from secondary medical complications and improvement in quality of life.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor