Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Paresthesia


Related Terms

  • Neuropathic Pain
  • Numbness and Tingling
  • Pins and Needles
  • Sensation Disturbance

Differential Diagnosis

  • Alcoholic neuropathy
  • Carcinomatous neuropathy (breast or lung cancer)
  • Diabetic neuropathy
  • Entrapment neuropathies (carpal tunnel, cubital tunnel, radial tunnel, tarsal tunnel, meralgia paresthetica, peroneal neuropathy)
  • Guillain-Barré syndrome
  • Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
  • Hypocalcemia
  • Medication side effect
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Radiculopathy (cervical or lumbar)
  • Restless legs syndrome
  • Stroke (infarction)
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)
  • Toxicologic conditions
  • Vitamin B12 deficiency

Specialists

  • Endocrinologist
  • Family Physician
  • General Surgeon
  • Hematologist
  • Internal Medicine Physician
  • Medical Toxicologist
  • Neurologist
  • Orthopedic (Orthopaedic) Surgeon
  • Pharmacologist
  • Physiatrist (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist)
  • Preventive Medicine Specialist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Length of disability is based on the primary disease, not the paresthesia. However, paresthesia can complicate the primary disease and influence the length of disability.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
782.0 - Symptoms Involving Skin and Other Integumentary Tissue; Disturbance of Skin Sensation; Anesthesia of Skin; Burning or Prickling Sensation; Hyperesthesia; Hypoesthesia; Numbness; Paresthesia; Tingling

Overview

Paresthesia is a symptom, not a disorder. It refers to an abnormal sensation that can occur without any apparent cause, although paresthesias also may occur in response to a stimulus such as hitting the "funny bone." Paresthesias are described as a tingling sensation, "pins and needles," prickling, electric shocks, burning, vibrating, buzzing, or crawling. Paresthesias also have been described as a sensation of the limb "falling asleep." Paresthesias may occur from abnormalities in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord), the peripheral nervous system, or from direct compression of peripheral nerves.

Paresthesias are symptoms of many different conditions including entrapment neuropathies (e.g., carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, radial tunnel syndrome, meralgia paresthetica), spinal nerve compression (e.g., cervical and lumbosacral radiculopathy), trauma, restless leg syndrome, metabolic disturbances (e.g., diabetic neuropathy, vitamin B12 deficiency, hypothyroidism, alcoholism), kidney disease, exposure to toxic chemicals (e.g., mercury, arsenic), and inflammatory connective tissue disorders (e.g., arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus). Less common causes of paresthesias include cancer, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hypocalcemia, malabsorption, multiple sclerosis, stroke, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and use of certain medications (e.g., isoniazid, vincristine, diuretics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]). Nonspecific numbness and tingling of the face, arms, and hands also is common in hyperventilation syndrome and panic attacks.

Incidence and Prevalence: Because paresthesia is a symptom rather than a diagnosis, there are no incidence statistics available for paresthesia itself. Incidence statistics vary according to the causative condition.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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