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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Paresthesia


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Treatment

Treatment for paresthesia is based on the underlying cause of the symptom. For example, carpal tunnel syndrome is treated with wrist splints, anti-inflammatory medications, or surgical decompression. Cubital tunnel syndrome is treated with splinting or surgical decompression. Compression of a nerve in the lower leg (the common peroneal nerve) may be relieved by not crossing the legs. Meralgia paresthetica, a condition characterized by numbness, tingling, and burning pain in the outer part of the thigh due to compression of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, usually improves with symptomatic and supportive treatment. Spinal radiculopathies are treated by avoiding activities that increase pain, following a physical therapy regimen, taking NSAIDs, corticosteroid injections, and surgery when relief is not obtained through previous therapies. Diabetic neuropathy is treated by tighter control of blood sugar levels, physical activity, and medications including NSAIDs, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and opioids (“Diabetic Neuropathies”). Vitamin B12 deficiency is treated with vitamin supplementation. Guillain-Barré syndrome is treated with plasma exchange therapy (plasmapheresis) and intravenous immune serum globulin. Multiple sclerosis may be treated with corticosteroid medications, disease immunomodulating agents (e.g., beta-interferon, glatiramer acetate), antispasticity agents, bladder antispasmodics, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, and antidepressants (Campagnolo).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor