Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Peripheral Neuropathy


Related Terms

  • Distal Sensorimotor Neuropathy
  • Peripheral Neuritis
  • Proximal Motor Polyneuropathy

Differential Diagnosis

  • Acromegaly
  • Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy
  • Alcohol (ethanol) related neuropathy
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease)
  • Bladder outlet obstruction
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease
  • Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy
  • Coagulopathies
  • Cytomegalovirus (CMV)
  • Diabetic neuropathy
  • Drug-induced paraneoplastic syndromes
  • Drugs
  • Electrolyte imbalance
  • Epstein-Barr virus
  • Gastrointestinal malignancy
  • Guillain-Barré syndrome
  • Heavy metal toxicity
  • Hepatitis C
  • Herpes infection
  • HIV
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Isoniazid
  • Kidney disease
  • Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome
  • Leprosy
  • Liver disease
  • Lyme disease
  • Metabolic neuropathy
  • Mononeuritis multiplex
  • Myasthenia gravis
  • Myocardial infarction (MI)
  • Necrotizing vasculitis
  • Nerve entrapment and compression
  • Neuropathy of leprosy
  • Paraneoplastic autonomic neuropathy
  • Peptic ulcer disease
  • Poisoning
  • Postsurgical vagotomy
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Sjögren syndrome
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus
  • Tumor
  • Uremia
  • Uremic neuropathy
  • Vacuolar myelopathy
  • Varicella zoster virus
  • Vasculitides
  • Vitamin B12 associated neurological diseases
  • Vitamin B6 intoxication
  • Vitamin deficiencies
  • Volume depletion

Specialists

  • Family Medicine Physician
  • Internal Medicine Physician
  • Neurologist
  • Neurosurgeon
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Physiatrist (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist)
  • Physical Therapist
  • Vocational Therapist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Length of disability depends on the success of identifying and treating the underlying cause, the location of the nerve damage, the severity of the symptoms, and the amount of functional loss (sensory loss and/or muscle weakness).

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
356.0 - Hereditary Peripheral Neuropathy; Dejerine-Sottas Disease
356.8 - Peripheral Neuropathy, Other Specified Idiopathic; Supranuclear Paralysis
356.9 - Hereditary and Idiopathic Peripheral Neuropathy, Unspecified

Failure to Recover

If an individual fails to recover within the expected maximum duration period, the reader may wish to consider the following questions to better understand the specifics of an individual's medical case.

Regarding diagnosis:

  • Has cause of peripheral neuropathy been confirmed (uncontrolled diabetes, alcoholism, active varicella zoster infection)?
  • Have nerve conduction tests been performed? Have nerve biopsies been taken? Are biopsies consistent with neuropathy or myelopathy?
  • What is the extent of neuropathy? Have nerve cell bodies been damaged? Will function be permanently affected?

Regarding treatment:

  • Is the underlying cause being effectively treated or controlled? By what standards?
  • Does treatment plan include nutritional supplements?
  • Has individual been able to abstain from alcohol?
  • Are analgesics or anti-seizure medications helping to relieve the pain? Tricyclic antidepressants?
  • Are steroids included in the treatment plan?
  • Would individual benefit from the use of a TENS device?
  • Was physical therapy prescribed for the individual? Is the individual compliant with physical therapy program?
  • If neuropathy was caused by compression of a neighboring anatomic structure, was surgical release or decompression effective in relieving symptoms?

Regarding prognosis:

  • Has underlying cause been identified and successfully treated before nerve cell bodies were destroyed? If diabetic, is the individual maintaining normal blood sugar levels?
  • If neuropathy is alcohol-induced, is the individual abstaining from alcohol? Would individual benefit from enrollment in a community program or support group?
  • Is neuropathy permanent?
  • Did neuropathy result in partial or complete loss of movement, function, or sensation?
  • How severe are the symptoms? Does individual have permanent disability?
  • Depending on the site, extent, and distribution of nerve damage, would work accommodations allow the individual to continue in same occupational duties?

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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