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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Peripheral Vascular Disease


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Overview

Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is a condition in which the arteries or veins carrying blood to or from the arms or legs become narrowed or clogged. While technically "vascular disease" would indicate disease in arteries or veins, this "PVD" term is usually used to discuss arterial disease. Deep vein thrombosis may provide additional information.

The feet and legs are more affected than the hands and arms. The most common symptom is leg cramps or pain that becomes worse with walking or other activity, and better with rest (intermittent claudication). Other symptoms may include leg numbness, tingling, or weakness. The feet may be cold or discolored. However, about 40% of those known by screening tests to have PVD have no symptoms (Roger).

The most common cause of narrowing of the peripheral arteries is atherosclerosis, which used to be called "hardening of the arteries." Atherosclerosis develops gradually as cholesterol and scar tissue build up, forming a substance called plaque that clogs the blood vessels. Atherosclerosis in the lower limb arteries is the same disease as atherosclerosis in the arteries is to the heart, brain, and kidney, for example. Thus, the risk factors (genetics, smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes) are the same regardless of what body part is being discussed. Individuals with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely to develop PVD than the general population (Selvin; Roger).

Other causes of narrowed lower limb arteries include trauma, vasculitis diseases, prior radiation therapy, and structural defects in the arteries that are present at birth.

Incidence and Prevalence: Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) affects about 4.3% of the population or about 5 to 8 million adults in the US (Selvin; Roger).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor