Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Phencyclidine Use Disorder


Related Terms

  • Angel Dust Abuse
  • PCP Abuse
  • Phencyclidine Addiction
  • Phencyclidine Dependence

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Cardiovascular Internist
  • Clinical Psychologist
  • Neurologist
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Physical Therapist
  • Psychiatrist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Length of disability is influenced by the duration and severity of phencyclidine use, the presence or absence of organ damage, any underlying mental illness, other substance use, the individual's social support system, the appropriateness of treatment, the individual's compliance with treatment and motivation to change, and the adequacy of ongoing care.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
304.60 - Drug Dependence, Other Specified; Unspecified
304.61 - Drug Dependence, Other Specified; Continuous
304.62 - Drug Dependence, Other Specified; Episodic
305.30 - Hallucinogen Abuse; Unspecified
305.31 - Hallucinogen Abuse; Continuous
305.32 - Hallucinogen Abuse; Episodic
305.33 - Hallucinogen Abuse; in Remission

Overview

The phencyclidines—a group of drugs with pain-killing (analgesic), numbing (anesthetic), and dissociative hallucinogenic properties—include phencyclidine (PCP, Sernylan), ketamine, and others. PCP is mainly used in veterinary medicine but has become popular as an illegally obtained recreational drug. These drugs can be taken orally, smoked, or injected intravenously to produce a sensory deprivation syndrome by affecting the central nervous system. Small doses create a feeling of euphoria, whereas larger doses may cause irrational rage and violent actions (suicide, mutilation, assault, or homicide), convulsions (seizures), psychosis, coma, or death. Common street names of phencyclidine are Angel Dust, Ashy Larry, Embalming Fluid, Hog, Illy, Love Boat, Lovely, PeaCe Pil, Rocket Fuel, Sherm, Tranq, Wack, Water, and Wet, reflecting the wide range of effects of the drug.

Phencyclidine intoxication includes behavioral symptoms, such as belligerence, assaultiveness, impulsiveness, psychomotor agitation, unpredictability, or impaired judgment; and clinical symptoms, such as increased blood pressure (hypertension) or heart rate (tachycardia), uncoordinated muscle movements, or hypersensitive hearing (hyperacusis). There are currently no strongly established symptoms of withdrawal for phencyclidines. These behavioral symptoms may be related to disturbances in two brain chemicals, dopamine and serotonin.

Note: For the substance/medication-induced disorders approach established by the DSM-IV-TR, and the DSM-5, please see the following topics: Substance/Medication-Induced Anxiety Disorder, Substance/Medication-Induced Bipolar and Related Disorder, Substance/Medication-Induced Depressive Disorder, Substance/Medication-Induced Major or Mild Neurocognitive Disorder, Substance/Medication-Induced Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorder, Substance/Medication-Induced Psychotic Disorder, Substance/Medication-Induced Sexual Dysfunction, and Substance/Medication-Induced Sleep Disorder.

Incidence and Prevalence: Seventy-five percent of emergency department cases involving the use of PCP involve men (DSM-IV-TR). In Canada, PCP is just as popular as in the US; in Mexico, there is not a great demand for artificial hallucinogens due to the large number of available indigenous hallucinogens, such as peyote, psilocybin mushrooms, and psychedelic morning glory seeds (Schmetzer).

The prevalence of phencyclidine use disorder is unknown. About 2.5% of the population reports having ever used phencyclidine. The proportion of users increases with age (DSM-5).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






Feedback
Send us comments, suggestions, corrections, or anything you would like us to hear. If you are not logged in, you must include your email address, in order for us to respond. We cannot, unfortunately, respond to every comment. If you are seeking medical advice, please contact your physician. Thank you!
Send this comment to:
Sales Customer Support Content Development
 
This publication is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. It is published with the understanding that the author, editors, and publisher are not engaged in rendering medical, legal, accounting or other professional service. If medical, legal, or other expert assistance is required, the service of a competent professional should be sought. We are unable to respond to requests for advice. Any Sales inquiries should include an email address or other means of communication.