Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Physical Therapy


Related Terms

  • Physical Medicine
  • Physical Rehabilitation
  • Physiotherapy
  • PT
  • Therapeutic Exercise

Specialists

  • Physical Therapist

Comorbid Conditions

  • Cancer
  • Cardiopulmonary disease
  • Dementia
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Obesity
  • Psychiatric disorders

Factors Influencing Duration

Disability is not associated with the different PT modalities, but rather with the underlying condition being treated.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
93.01 - Functional Evaluation
93.02 - Orthotic Evaluation
93.03 - Prosthetic Evaluation
93.04 - Manual Testing of Muscle Function
93.05 - Range of Motion Testing
93.06 - Measurement of Limb Length
93.07 - Body Measurement; Girth Measurement; Measurement of Skull Circumference
93.09 - Diagnostic Physical Therapy Procedure, Other
93.11 - Assisting Exercise
93.12 - Active Musculoskeletal Exercise, Other
93.13 - Resistive Exercise
93.14 - Training in Joint Movements
93.15 - Mobilization of Spine
93.16 - Mobilization of Other Joints
93.17 - Passive Musculoskeletal Exercise, Other
93.18 - Breathing Exercise
93.19 - Exercise, Not Elsewhere Classified
93.21 - Traction, Manual and Mechanical
93.22 - Ambulation and Gait Training
93.23 - Orthotic Device Fitting
93.24 - Training in Use of Prosthetic or Orthotic Device; Training in Crutch Walking
93.25 - Forced Extension of Limb
93.26 - Manual Rupture of Joint Adhesions
93.27 - Stretching of Muscle or Tendon
93.28 - Stretching of Fascia
93.29 - Forcible Correction of Deformity, Other
93.31 - Pool Exercise, Assisted
93.32 - Whirlpool Treatment
93.33 - Hydrotherapy, Other
93.34 - Diathermy
93.36 - Cardiac Retraining
93.37 - Prenatal Training; Training for Natural Childbirth
93.38 - Physical Therapy, Combined, without Mention of the Components

Overview

Physical therapy (PT) is the healthcare profession concerned with the evaluation, treatment, and prevention of physical disabilities caused by disease or injury. This medical discipline is used as a conservative measure prior to, in conjunction with, or following other treatment options such as medicines or surgery. PT is practiced in hospitals, rehabilitation centers, private therapist-owned offices, extended care facilities, home health agencies, special diagnostic clinics in outpatient treatment centers, academic institutions, fitness and wellness centers, and research centers.

PT as a profession has been recognized in the US for more than 75 years. The profession began with a focus on the rehabilitation of individuals from diseases such as polio. Since then, PT has branched out from traditional areas such as orthopedics and neurology into areas like women's health, ergonomics, and cardiopulmonary disease. PT is practiced throughout the world, with teams of visiting therapists from Europe and the US traveling to developing nations to provide instruction on therapeutic techniques, as well as the use of equipment such as crutches and prosthetic limbs.

PT uses a wide variety of techniques, ranging from soft tissue and joint mobilization to acupressure and trigger point release, to help restore and improve flexibility of muscles, tendons, and joints. PT also uses various techniques for soft tissue healing, such as hydrotherapy, electrical stimulation, application of cold or heat, shortwave diathermy, low-level laser therapy, and ultrasound. Therapeutic exercise is an important part of PT, helping to strengthen muscles and joints weakened by disease and injury.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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