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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Plantar Fasciitis


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Overview

Plantar fasciitis is a painful condition that results when the thick, fibrous band on the sole of the foot, which extends from the bottom of the heel bone (calcaneus) to the base of the toes (plantar fascia), becomes irritated and swollen (inflamed). Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. Sometimes, this condition is referred to as “heel spurs,” but that is really a misnomer, since there is no connection between the presence of a heel spur and plantar fasciitis.

The plantar fascia holds the many foot bones in place, supports the arch of the foot, and acts as a shock absorber. Inflammation and/or degeneration of the plantar fascia can result from mechanical strain (traumatic fasciitis), abnormalities of foot structure (biomechanical plantar fasciitis), systemic inflammatory diseases, or unknown (idiopathic) causes.

Foot pain caused by plantar fasciitis may occur in several locations: (1) along the entire course of the plantar fascia due to microtears in the band, (2) at the plantar fascia's point of attachment to the calcaneus, (3) along the inside edge of the arch (medial band plantar fasciitis), (4) in the middle of the arch (central band plantar fasciitis), or (5) along the outer edge of the arch (lateral band plantar fasciitis). Both feet are involved in about one-third of cases.

Incidence and Prevalence: Plantar fasciitis occurs in about 10% of the general population and represents 10–15% of foot problems requiring professional care (Singh). Women are twice as likely as men to get plantar fasciitis (Foye).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor