Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Aplastic Anemia


Diagnosis

History: Symptoms may begin weeks or months after exposure to a causative agent. The individual may report bleeding from the gums or other mucous membranes, bleeding under the skin, heavy menstrual flow, and easy bruising because of a low number of platelets. Individuals may feel weak and fatigued and have pallor due to anemia (low hemoglobin). Initially, individuals usually present with few, if any, systemic complaints. They may have ulcers of the mouth and tongue, fever, or a sore throat. There may be history of infection because of a low number of white blood cells (neutropenia). The individual may be pregnant; have a family history of Fanconi anemia; or have a history of exposure to radiation, infection, chemicals, or drugs known to be associated with aplastic anemia.

Physical exam: Small capillary hemorrhages (bleeding) under the skin (petechiae) or larger areas of bruising under the skin (ecchymoses) may be seen. There may also be evidence of bleeding in the eye (retinal hemorrhage). If anemia is severe, a heart murmur may be detected. With Fanconi anemia, conditions such as skeletal anomalies, skin discoloration, mental retardation, or learning disabilities may be detected, but often are not present.

Tests: A complete blood count (CBC) will show significant pancytopenia. A reticulocyte count shows a low number of immature red blood cells (reticulocytes). Diagnosis is generally confirmed by a bone marrow biopsy with an assessment of cellularity. The marrow is evaluated for the degree of maturation of all cell lines and has a low number of cells (hypocellular marrow). Abnormal cells are not found. Additional tests may be performed to identify the cause of the aplastic anemia. These tests may include serological tests to check for infection. If Fanconi anemia is suspected, a peripheral chromosome analysis (cytogenetic breakage study) may be performed.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor