Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Atrophy, Muscular (Progressive)


Rehabilitation

The goal of rehabilitation for progressive muscular atrophy is to maintain function and enhance mobility for as long as possible. In the early stage of the disease, physical therapy for active range of motion exercises can help maintain flexibility and strength and relieve the musculoskeletal pain associated with muscular weakness, paralysis, and immobility. During active range of motion exercises, the individual performs all the motion independently with or without resistance from an outside force. Resistance may be provided through use of an elastic band or light weights (isotonic exercise). In later stages, passive range of motion is preferable to avoid overexertion or possible damage to the muscles. In passive range of motion exercises, the therapist moves the involved limb without effort from the individual.

Because of muscle weakness in the legs, balance exercises are beneficial and include side stepping and walking with the eyes closed with and without assistance. Respiratory muscles can also become progressively weak as the disease advances, so exercises to strengthen muscles that assist in breathing become part of the program.

Learning how to avoid injury is another important intervention in the rehabilitation of progressive muscular atrophy. Occupational therapy helps individuals arrange their homes and organize their lives in ways that support their physical and mental well-being. Activities are also provided to relieve the mental boredom of inactivity. Devices and techniques that help the individual communicate are invaluable in maintaining peace of mind.

Counseling and support groups can help individuals and caregivers cope with the devastating physical aspects of the disease. The rehabilitation program varies between individuals with progressive muscular atrophy as the intensity and progression of the exercise depends on the stage of the disease and the individual's overall health.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor