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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Hodgkin's Disease


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Overview

Hodgkin's disease accounts for about 14% of cancers that develop in lymphatic tissue, and for about 0.6% of all cancers. All other types of lymphoma are called non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Lymphatic tissue includes lymph nodes connected throughout the body by a network of vessels, the spleen, thymus, and bone marrow. Lymph nodes make and store lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell. Lymphatic vessels transport the lymphocytes in a clear fluid called lymph to the bloodstream. Hodgkin's disease is caused by the development of an abnormal type of lymphocyte called a Reed-Sternberg cell. This cell divides rapidly and replicates uncontrollably, destroying the normal structure and function of the tissue within the lymphatic system.

Hodgkin's disease usually begins as a painless swelling of a lymph node, most commonly in the chest, neck, or underarms; it then spreads to adjoining nodes. It may also spread to the bloodstream and be carried to distant sites including the liver, lungs, and bone marrow.

There is no definitive cause for Hodgkin's disease, but the same virus (Epstein-Barr virus) responsible for infectious mononucleosis is found in the tumor cells of about 50% of individuals with some types of Hodgkin's disease. Individuals who have had mononucleosis have about a fourfold increased risk of developing EB virus containing Hodgkin's disease with a mean latency of about 4 years. Individuals with reduced immunity because of HIV infection, immunosuppressive medication, or immune deficiency diseases may also have greater risk for Hodgkin's disease. A genetic predisposition has also been noted, as well as a relationship to certain human leukocyte (white blood cell) antigens (HLA).

Incidence and Prevalence: Hodgkin's disease affects 2.9 per 100,000 people in the US (Argiris). About 8,000 cases are diagnosed in the US each year, compared to 800 in Canada (Kaufman). The incidence rate has been declining for over 20 years at a rate of about 0.9% per year ("Hodgkin's Disease"). Because of advances in treatment, the death rate has fallen more than 60% in the past 30 years ("Detailed Guide"). Incidence of Hodgkin's disease is 59,000 individuals worldwide (Argiris).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor