Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Hodgkin's Disease


Diagnosis

History: Individuals are often asymptomatic. Some will report a painless, swollen lump in the neck, groin (ilioinguinal-femoral region), or under the arm. Others will report vague symptoms such as persistent fever, weight loss, night sweats, itching (pruritus), and fatigue. Characteristically, the fever is cyclic (Pel-Ebstein fever) and may recur at variable intervals of several days to many weeks.

Physical exam: Enlarged lymph nodes, nearly always in the neck or armpit, but occasionally in the groin, are usually noted during physical examination. The nodes may be hard, rubbery, or soft. Enlargement of both the spleen (splenomegaly) and liver (hepatomegaly) may be noticed during palpation of the abdomen. If the cancer is advanced, large masses may appear on the neck, producing the "bull-neck" appearance characteristic of late-stage Hodgkin's disease.

Tests: Blood tests include complete blood count (CBC) to evaluate numbers of red blood cells (RBCs) and white blood cells (WBCs), hemoglobin, and platelets. RBCs and hemoglobin may be reduced due to anemia. WBCs may be elevated as part of the immune system response to disease or inflammation. Blood chemistries such as blood protein (serum albumin), uric acid, and liver enzymes will be performed. An erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) may be done to determine if inflammation is present.

Definitive diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease requires taking a sample of tissue (biopsy) from an enlarged lymph node, staining the tissue cells (immunohistochemical staining), and examining them under a microscope. A pathologist will examine the stained cells to identify Reed-Sternberg cells typical of Hodgkin's disease; staging of the disease can be done at the same time by classifying cells from different sites. The cells may be stained (immunophenotyping) to identify molecules on the cell surface. Classical Hodgkin lymphoma cells express CD15 and CD 30, variably express CD20, and do not express CD 3 or CD 45.

If the biopsy confirms the diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease, additional tests will be conducted. Other tests may include a chest x-ray (radiographic examination) to identify enlarged lymph nodes in the middle of the chest (mediastinal mass). A CT scan, MRI, positron emission tomography (PET), gallium scan, or an exploratory abdominal surgical procedure (laparotomy) may help determine if the disease has spread outside the lymph system. A sample of bone marrow (bone marrow biopsy) may reveal bone involvement.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor