Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA)


Diagnosis

History: Local skin infections caused by MRSA may produce a red, warm, swollen area at the infection site; an abscess may form if the area is not treated early. As the infection progresses, the area may become painful and the individual may report a fever. Pus (purulent discharge) may be present in the sore (as in boils), under the skin (as in abscesses), or draining from the sore (as in carbuncles, a stye in the eyelid, or impetigo blisters on the skin surface). More serious systemic staphylococcal infection in a hospitalized individual may produce chills and fever, low blood pressure (hypotension), cough, chest pain, general malaise, headache, muscle aches, and rash. The individual may complain of fatigue and shortness of breath. Medication history is important in determining if the individual is already taking antibiotics with no apparent results. A history of recent hospitalization or surgery may be reported. History of acute or chronic illness, recent surgery, implanted devices or prostheses, and recent pregnancy and childbirth, also may be reported.

Physical exam: Signs of infection may include localized skin infections with redness and warmth (erythema), swelling (edema), and the presence of purulent discharge. Draining sinus tracts may be noted. The individual is examined for any open wounds from either injury or recent surgery. A primary site of infection may not be found in a hospitalized individual. Fever may be present. Blood pressure may be low. Confusion or mental deterioration may be apparent. Heart irregularities (e.g., regurgitant murmur) suggestive of endocarditis and lung sounds suggestive of pneumonia may be noted on examination with a stethoscope (auscultation). The individual will be evaluated for indications of organ failure. An all-over reddish or sunburned appearance of the skin (diffuse erythroderma) with high fever may indicate systemic infection and impending toxic shock syndrome.

Tests: The most important diagnostic test is to isolate and identify the bacterium causing the infection. This is done by performing a culture of the purulent material at the site of localized infection or, in systemic infection, culturing blood and urine samples, swabs of drainage in the nose and throat, material raised on coughing (sputum), and bone marrow or joint fluid removed by needle aspiration. Once the infective organism is identified, sensitivity studies are done to determine the most effective antibiotic, as well as those to which the organism is resistant. Methicillin usually is included in sensitivity testing to help confirm MRSA. Culture and sensitivity testing is a lengthy process involving the growth of bacterial colonies on special media over several days until results can be read by a bacteriologist. Finding an appropriate antibiotic may take even more time if MRSA is the causative organism.

If MRSA is isolated or suspected, a coagulase test will be done to evaluate the ability of S. aureus to produce the coagulase enzyme, confirming the diagnosis. If systemic infection is present, other laboratory tests often include a complete blood count (CBC) with differential to examine white cell response by the immune system; a chemistry panel including electrolytes, liver and kidney function tests, and cardiac enzymes; C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) to evaluate inflammation level; and urinalysis and 24-hour urine tests to evaluate kidney function and fluid balance. A chest x-ray may be done to assess for pneumonia. In individuals with infective endocarditis and high-grade MRSA bacteremia with no definitive source of infection or in cases of suspected catheter-related bacteremia, transthoracic echocardiography (transesophageal echocardiography or TEE) may be performed.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor