Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA)


Treatment

Antibiotic therapy is the primary treatment for staphylococcal infection even though it may be complicated by antibiotic resistance. While awaiting culture results to confirm MRSA, the individual may be started on a known anti-MRSA agent until the sensitivity test results are available. Although serious MRSA infections are becoming more difficult to treat with antibiotics, some antibiotics that have been shown to be effective against antibiotic-resistant S. aureus include clindamycin, daptomycin, doxycycline, linezolid, minocycline, tetracycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and vancomycin. Local infection by MRSA may require only draining the abscess and giving an antibiotic that has been shown on culture and sensitivity studies to be effective against the MRSA bacterium causing the infection. The full course of antibiotics prescribed must be taken since discontinuing the drug may lead to recurrence of the infection. If the individual has been receiving immunosuppressant therapy, it may be discontinued until the infection has responded to treatment.

Treatment for systemic infection, such as blood poisoning (septicemia), pneumonia, or bacteremia, may include round-the-clock IV antibiotics, IV fluid administration, kidney dialysis if the infection causes kidney failure, and oxygen, as needed. Infected prosthetics, such as heart valves or artificial joints, grafts, or pacemakers, may be surgically removed and replaced. Surgical intervention also may be needed to treat joint infections, postoperative abscesses, and osteomyelitis. Antibiotic therapy is administered before, during, and after surgical procedures. Endocarditis usually requires a prolonged period of antibiotic treatment; duration of antibiotic treatment for other infections varies according to the type and extent of the infection. Combinations of antibiotics may be used to address all pathogens causing the infection.

Hospitalized individuals with MRSA usually are isolated from other individuals to reduce the risk of spreading the infection. Hospital personnel and visitors are required to follow sterile procedures before and after contact with an individual in isolation.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor