Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Prostatitis


Related Terms

  • Prostate Gland Inflammation

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Urologist

Comorbid Conditions

  • Benign prostatic hypertrophy
  • Untreated sexually transmitted diseases

Factors Influencing Duration

Length of disability may be influenced by the severity of the inflammation and the response of the prostate to drug treatment. Older individuals may require a longer recovery time especially if surgery was necessary.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
601 - Prostatitis; Inflammatory Disease of the Prostate
601.0 - Prostatitis, Acute
601.1 - Prostatitis, Chronic
601.2 - Abscess of Prostate
601.3 - Prostatocystitis
601.8 - Inflammatory Diseases of Prostate, Other Specified
601.9 - Prostatitis, Unspecified; Prostatitis NOS

Diagnosis

History: Individuals with acute bacterial prostatitis will report chills, low back pain, suprapubic and perineal pain, the urge to urinate frequently at night (nocturia), painful urination (dysuria), and a variable, slow urine stream that can be secondary to bladder outlet obstruction. Diffuse muscle and joint pain (myalgia and arthralgia respectively) may also be reported.

Symptoms reported by individuals with chronic bacterial prostatitis are inconsistent. Although some have no symptoms (asymptomatic), most have varying degrees of the irritation and urinary bladder dysfunction common to acute bacterial prostatitis. Low back pain, perineal discomfort, myalgia and arthralgia are also common complaints.

Individuals with nonbacterial prostatitis report symptoms similar to either the acute or chronic bacterial forms of the disease.

Physical exam: Insertion of a gloved finger into the rectum to feel the prostate (rectal palpation) will reveal a tender, swollen prostate gland. The inflammation may affect all or only part of the prostate. In individuals with chronic bacterial prostatitis, the prostate may feel normal, firm, or swollen in certain places. Palpation may also reveal a grating feeling (crepitation) if large prostatic stones (calculi) are present. Examination of individuals with nonbacterial prostatitis will reveal symptoms similar to those of acute or chronic bacterial forms of the disease.

Tests: For all types of prostatitis, a complete blood count (CBC) with a white blood cell differential may be performed to identify signs of infection. Urinalysis and urine culture can be performed to identify white blood cells, red blood cells, or bacteria in the urine (pyuria, hematuria, or bacilluria, respectively). A culture of the prostatic secretion obtained after massaging the prostate gland may also be performed. X-rays can be taken to identify the presence of complicating factors, such as prostatic enlargement or stones (calculi) in the prostate. In patients with chronic bacterial infections, a flexible fiberoptic viewing scope (endoscope) can be inserted into the tube (urethra) draining urine from the bladder (urethroscopy) in order to identify the presence of complicating factors such as prostate gland enlargement, benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), blockage of the urethra (urethral stricture), or kidney (renal) infection.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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