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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Psychotic Disorder, Unspecified


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Overview

In a psychotic disorder, perception and understanding of reality is severely impaired. Symptoms may include fixed but untrue beliefs (delusions), seeing visions or hearing voices (hallucinations), confusion, disorganized speech, exaggerated or diminished emotions, or bizarre behavior. Level of functioning may be severely impaired with social withdrawal and inability to attend to work, relationships, or even basic personal care. Individuals generally have little awareness of the mental abnormalities associated with their illness.

An unspecific psychotic disorder occurs when the psychotic symptoms though present do not meet all the diagnostic criteria for a specific psychotic disorder such as schizophrenia. It may be impossible to identify a specific psychotic disorder due to insufficient information or contradictory findings.

Psychotic symptoms are described as positive or negative. Positive symptoms are delusions, hallucinations, bizarre behaviors, and thought broadcasting where the individual believes others can supernaturally influence his or her thoughts or vice versa. Negative symptoms refer to a reduction or loss of normal functions such as restriction and flattening of emotions, severely reduced speech or thought, and lack of interest in goal-directed activities.

A delusion is a firm belief that others cannot verify. The delusional individual clings to the belief despite evidence to the contrary. A common type of delusion involves thoughts of persecution such as being spied upon or conspired against. There may also be delusions of grandeur where individuals believe they have extraordinary powers, are on a special mission, or think they are someone important such as Jesus Christ. The delusion is termed bizarre if it is not based on ordinary life experiences. An example is of aliens controlling an individual's body and/or thoughts.

Hallucinations are sensory perceptions that no one else can detect and can involve the sense of sight, touch, hearing, smell, or taste. Hearing voices is the most frequent hallucination in psychosis. The hallucinations occur when the individual is awake.

Disorganized thoughts (loosening of associations) are characterized by jumping from one topic to another. Grossly disorganized behavior can result in neglect of personal appearance and hygiene, proper nutrition, and other tasks of living. The individual may dress inappropriately and act unpredictably such as shouting or swearing in public. At the other behavioral extreme is catatonia where the individual becomes withdrawn, immobile, and unaware of the surrounding world.

Emotional flatness may include an unresponsive face and little eye contact with another individual. Emotions may be inappropriate for the situation such as laughing at a situation no one else finds amusing or crying for any apparent reason. Unexplained fear, anger, or sadness may also be present. Abnormal movements can include continuous pacing, rocking, facial grimacing, or rigid immobility in strange postures.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor