Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Rehabilitation Therapy


Related Terms

  • Cognitive Therapy
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Physical Therapy
  • Recreational Therapy
  • Speech Therapy
  • Vocational Rehabilitation

Specialists

  • Chiropractor
  • Neurologist
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Oncologist
  • Orthopedic (Orthopaedic) Surgeon
  • Physiatrist (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist)
  • Physical Therapist
  • Psychiatrist
  • Pulmonologist
  • Recreational Therapist

Comorbid Conditions

  • Alcohol or substance abuse disorders
  • Cancer
  • Obesity
  • Psychiatric disorders

Factors Influencing Duration

Because there is no disability associated with the rehabilitation therapy itself, the only factor influencing the length of disability involves the underlying condition that prompted therapy. This factor will require evaluation on a case-by-case basis.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
93.8 - Rehabilitation Therapy
93.81 - Recreation Therapy; Diversional Therapy; Play Therapy
93.82 - Educational Therapy; Education of Bed-bound Children; Special Schooling for the Handicapped
93.89 - Rehabilitation, Not Elsewhere Classified

Overview

Rehabilitation therapy comprises various treatments aimed to increase functional independence, prevent further loss of function, and maintain or improve quality of life for individuals living with physical illnesses or conditions. The desired outcome is to enhance the individual's independence in as many aspects of life as possible, including activities of daily living, work, and family responsibilities. There are many different types of rehabilitation therapy, including occupational, physical, speech, respiratory, recreational, cognitive/psychological, and social services therapy.

Occupational and physical therapists employ meaningful work and self-care tasks to help individuals regain functional mobility, strength, and range of motion. Speech therapists promote effective communication and swallowing. Respiratory therapists work to maintain a clear airway and decrease respiratory distress. Social workers facilitate rehabilitation through careful discharge planning and coordination of ancillary services. Recreational therapists work to improve socialization and community reintegration. Psychologists and psychiatrists help to decrease depression, maintain motivation, and set realistic expectations for recovery. All rehabilitation therapists strive to promote functional independence and to prevent further disability.

Rehabilitation therapy may be used pre-operatively to improve strength, flexibility, endurance, and coping strategies. Rehabilitation may also be used postoperatively to assist in recovery from a variety of conditions. Therapy may help with rehabilitation after an acute condition such as stroke or in more chronic conditions such as arthritis. Therapy interventions should involve family members in the coordination of care to maximize an individual's functional gains.

Rehabilitation therapy may be conducted in five major types of settings, including inpatient acute care hospitals, inpatient rehabilitation units, outpatient clinics, skilled nursing facilities (with or without a subacute unit), and the individual's home (home health care).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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