Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Repair (Reconstruction), Anterior Cruciate Ligament


Related Terms

  • ACL Reattachment
  • ACL Reconstruction

Specialists

  • Orthopedic (Orthopaedic) Surgeon
  • Physiatrist (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist)
  • Physical Therapist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Work requirements, complications, and inability or unwillingness to participate in a rehabilitation program will affect length of disability. Associated injuries and treatment will also affect the duration of disability. Activities stressful to the knee must be avoided. If job duties can be performed while sitting, duration may be shorter.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
81.45 - Repair of Anterior Cruciate Ligament, Other

Overview

© Reed Group
Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair or reconstruction is a surgical procedure used to restore the integrity and function of the ACL after it has been ruptured or torn from (avulsed from) the skeletal structure of the knee. Unlike other body tissues, the ACL does not heal or repair itself after injury. The ligament is intra-articular and thus the joint fluid that is normally present in the joint and that nourishes the articular cartilage prevents blood clot formation (preventing the first stage in ligament healing). Although the term "ACL repair" is often used interchangeably, the actual surgery is a reconstruction using graft tissue.

The ACL is a powerful ligament extending from the top-front surface of the shinbone (tibia) to the bottom-rear surface of the thighbone (femur). The ligament prevents "anterior" instability in the knee joint (tibia moving anteriorly from underneath the femur). The ACL also provides rotational stability to the knee. This stability is particularly important to athletes or individuals whose activities include running, jumping, or kicking.

ACL injury can occur when an individual comes to a quick stop (sudden deceleration); suddenly changes direction while running, pivoting, or landing from a jump; or overextends the knee joint. The ACL is the most commonly injured major knee ligament. Injury prevention includes hamstring-strengthening exercises and the use of proper techniques when playing sports or exercising.

There is little functional demand on the anterior cruciate ligament during normal level ground walking, with sports. Uneven ground, heavy carrying, and landing from jumps being the primary stressors.

Many cases of ACL injury occur in conjunction with other knee injuries. Approximately 50% of individuals with ACL injuries also have meniscal tears (Gammons).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






Feedback
Send us comments, suggestions, corrections, or anything you would like us to hear. If you are not logged in, you must include your email address, in order for us to respond. We cannot, unfortunately, respond to every comment. If you are seeking medical advice, please contact your physician. Thank you!
Send this comment to:
Sales Customer Support Content Development
 
This publication is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. It is published with the understanding that the author, editors, and publisher are not engaged in rendering medical, legal, accounting or other professional service. If medical, legal, or other expert assistance is required, the service of a competent professional should be sought. We are unable to respond to requests for advice. Any Sales inquiries should include an email address or other means of communication.