Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Repair, Hammertoe


Related Terms

  • Hammertoe
  • Morton Toe Repair

Specialists

  • Orthopedic (Orthopaedic) Surgeon

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Postoperative complications prolong disability. Multiple procedures involving the foot or procedures done on both feet at the same time can lengthen disability. Length of disability for this condition is also often extended if return to work tasks require the use of steel-toed safety shoes.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
77.56 - Repair of Hammer Toe; Filleting of Hammer Toe; Fusion of Hammer Toe; Phalangectomy (Partial) of Hammer Toe

Overview

Hammertoe repair is a surgical procedure to correct a deformity (hammertoe) caused when tendons of the involved toe become too tight (contracted). This causes the joint to be excessively bent (flexed), usually at the first toe joint (proximal interphalangeal joint or PIP joint). The deformity can result in painful corns and callus formation on the bony prominences.

There are several possible causes for hammertoe. These include the second bone in the toe being significantly longer than the first (Morton's toe), inflammation and instability of the toe joint (synovitis), neuromuscular conditions, and improperly fitted shoes. Regardless of cause, individuals typically complain of pain over the raised portion of the toe.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Reason for Procedure

The procedure is performed to correct a hammertoe, a deformity where one or more toes are abnormally flexed at the first joint of the toe. Surgery is done when conservative measures such as stretching, injections of corticosteroids, and trimming corns and calluses have failed and the deformity is rigid.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



How Procedure is Performed

Multiple surgical techniques are available for correcting hammertoe deformity. Surgery is scheduled on an outpatient basis under regional or general anesthesia. If the deformity is rigid, a section of bone is removed in the toe at the site of the deformity (ostectomy of the PIP joint). The toe is then stabilized internally with a Kirschner pin. If the pin is allowed to remain in place, fusion of the bones will occur (arthrodesis). Alternately, the end of the pin may be removed in 4 to 6 weeks. In this case, no fusion occurs. Dissolvable pins are also sometimes used.

Another technique is to place a piece of tendon between the edges of the bone (arthroplasty). Sometimes a piece of tendon is transferred from the underside of the toe to the upper side (flexor to extensor tendon transfer). This corrects the deformity by changing the direction of pull by the tendon. Several procedures may be combined to treat the deformity.

A soft dressing is used for immobilization along with a postoperative shoe for 4 weeks. Weight bearing is restricted in all procedures.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Prognosis

Full correction of the deformity can be expected although recovery is often slow and pain may continue for several weeks.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Complications

Injury to the nerves or blood vessels, delayed wound healing, pain in the metatarsal region (bones between the ankle and the toes), infection, skin sloughing, and failure to correct the deformity can result from the procedure. If the second toe is involved, initial correction may be changed with pressure from the great toe, with the second toe drifting to the outside (molding).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Ability to Work (Return to Work Considerations)

Standing, stair or ladder climbing, and walking may need to temporarily be limited. Special shoes with a somewhat stiffer sole are often required during recovery. Rest periods to elevate the lower leg are necessary during early recovery.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



References

General

"Hammertoe and Mallet Toe." MayoClinic.com. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. 24 May 2005 <http:www.mayoclinic.com/invoke.cfm?id=DS00480>.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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