Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Repetitive Strain Injury


Related Terms

  • CTD
  • Cumulative Trauma Disorder
  • MSD
  • Repetitive Motion Disorder
  • Repetitive Task Disorder
  • RSI

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
354.0 - Carpal Tunnel Syndrome; Median Nerve Entrapment; Partial Thenar Atrophy
723.3 - Cervicobrachial Syndrome (Diffuse)
724.2 - Lumbago; Low Back Pain; Low Back Syndrome; Lumbalgia
726.32 - Lateral Epicondylitis; Golfers Elbow; Tennis Elbow
727.03 - Trigger Finger (Acquired)
727.04 - Radial Styloid Tenosynovitis; de Quervains Disease
729.5 - Other Disorders of Soft Tissue; Pain in Limb
840.3 - Sprains and Strains of Shoulder and Upper Arm, Infraspinatus (Muscle) (Tendon)
840.5 - Sprains and Strains of Shoulder and Upper Arm, Subscapularis (Muscle)
840.6 - Sprains and Strains of Shoulder and Upper Arm, Supraspinatus (Muscle) (Tendon)
840.8 - Sprains and Strains of Shoulder and Upper Arm, Other Specified Sites of Shoulder and Upper Arm
841.8 - Sprains and Strains of Elbow and Forearm, Other Specified Sites
841.9 - Sprains and Strains of Elbow and Forearm, Unspecified Site; Elbow NOS
842.00 - Sprains and Strains, Wrist, Unspecified Site
842.02 - Sprains and Strains, Wrist, Radiocarpal Joint
842.09 - Sprains and Strains, Wrist, Other; Sprains and Strains, Radioulnar Joint, Distal

Overview

Repetitive strain injuries (RSI), also known as cumulative trauma disorders (CTD), are labels for musculoskeletal pain that is associated with physical activity. The suggested but currently scientifically unproven concept is that small but cumulative tissue damage results from performance of repeated and sustained tasks. There is usually no acute injury involved with the onset of symptoms, which include pain, weakness, and loss of function. All cases have in common the overuse of muscle tendon units. The terms RSI and CTD are often used indiscriminately; it is preferable to have a specific anatomic diagnosis for a painful disorder using the ICD-9 definitions instead of the labels of RSI, CTD, or musculoskeletal disorders (MSD).

Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) require two parts: An individual, and a job. Each individual has unique risk factors for the likelihood of developing musculoskeletal pain. These include age, sex, inherited characteristics, deconditioning, increased body mass index, and biosocial traits (behavioral issues such as job dissatisfaction or conflict in the workplace which may be confounding factors when interpreting complaints attributed to RSI). The job also has unique risk factors commonly described by ergonomists as repetition, high force, awkward joint position, direct pressure, vibration, cold temperatures, and prolonged constrained posture. Work-related risk factors can be aggravated by inadequate work-rest cycles, excessive pace or duration of work, unaccustomed work and lack of task variability, and machine-paced work.

For information on specific injuries, see carpal tunnel syndrome, de Quervain's syndrome, radial styloid tenosynovitis, epicondylitis, trigger finger, Raynaud's phenomenon, and low back pain.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



References

General

Talmage, J. B., and J. M. Melhorn, eds. "Why Staying at Work or Returning to Work is in the Patient's Best Interest." A Physician's Guide to Return to Work. Chicago: AMA Press, 2005.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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