Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Retinal Detachment


Related Terms

  • Detached Retina
  • Retinal Break
  • Retinal Tear
  • Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment
  • Serous Retinal Detachment
  • Traction Retinal Detachment

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Ophthalmologist

Comorbid Conditions

  • Blood dyscrasias
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Connective tissue disorders
  • Diabetes
  • Endocrine disorders
  • Neurologic conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

The underlying cause of the condition, speed of intervention, method of treatment, individual response to treatment, and presence of complications, may influence length of disability.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
361 - Retinal Detachments and Defects
361.0 - Retinal Detachment with Retinal Defect; Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment
361.00 - Retinal Detachment with Retinal Defect, Unspecified
361.01 - Retinal Detachment with Retinal Defect; Recent Detachment, Partial, with Single Defect
361.02 - Retinal Detachment with Retinal Defect; Recent Detachment, Partial, with Multiple Defects
361.03 - Retinal Detachment with Retinal Defect; Recent Detachment, Partial, with Giant Tear
361.05 - Retinal Detachment with Retinal Defect; Recent Detachment, Total or Subtotal
361.06 - Retinal Detachment with Retinal Defect; Old Detachment, Partial; Delimited Old Retinal Detachment
361.07 - Retinal Detachment with Retinal Defect; Old Detachment, Total or Subtotal
361.2 - Serous Retinal Detachment; Retinal Detachment without Retinal Defect
361.8 - Retinal Detachment, Other Forms; Traction Detachment of Retina
361.81 - Traction Detachment of Retina; Traction Detachment with Vitreoretinal Organization
361.89 - Retinal Detachment, Other Forms; Traction Detachment of Retina, Other
361.9 - Retinal Detachment; Unspecified

Overview

© Reed Group
Retinal detachment occurs when the light-sensitive, multi-layered tissue at the inner back surface of the eyeball (retina) tears or is pushed away from supporting layers that contain nourishing blood vessels (choroid). A break, tear, or hole in the retina usually precedes detachment. Detachment may occur suddenly as gel-like fluids within the eye (vitreous humor) leak beneath the retina (rhegmatogenous detachment) separating it from the choroid. Retinal detachment also can result when the vitreous gel inside the eye degenerates, contracts, and liquefies with aging, causing it to pull on the retina and tear it away from the choroid (traction retinal detachment). The retina also may detach if there is an increase of fluid in the space behind the retina (subretinal space) that forces the retina away from the choroid (serous detachment) (Garg).

Because retinal cells degenerate and die if separated from oxygen and nutrients provided by the choroid, treatment must begin as soon as possible to restore and preserve vision. Central vision may be affected if the center portion of the eye responsible for detailed vision (macula) becomes detached. Without prompt reattachment of the retina through surgery, vision loss will be permanent.

Incidence and Prevalence: Retinal detachment occurs in 10 to 12.5 of 100,000 population annually (Larkin). In younger individuals, the male: female ratio for retinal detachment is 3:2 (Larkin).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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