Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Salpingectomy


Related Terms

  • Excision of Fallopian Tube(s)

Specialists

  • Gynecologist
  • Obstetrician/Gynecologist

Comorbid Conditions

  • Allergies to pain medications
  • Heart and lung conditions
  • Obesity

Factors Influencing Duration

Length of disability may be influenced by type of procedure (laparoscopy, minilaparotomy, or laparotomy), reason for the procedure, complications, and job demands related to the surgery and anesthesia.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
66.4 - Total Unilateral Salpingectomy
66.51 - Removal of Both Fallopian Tubes at Same Operative Episode
66.52 - Removal of Remaining Fallopian Tube; Removal of Solitary Fallopian Tube
66.62 - Salpingectomy with Removal of Tubal Pregnancy
66.63 - Salpingectomy, Bilateral Partial, Not Otherwise Specified
66.69 - Salpingectomy, Partial, Other

Overview

© Reed Group
Salpingectomy is the surgical removal of one or both fallopian tubes. The fallopian tubes serve as a passageway for an ovum to travel from the ovary to the uterus. In a unilateral salpingectomy, only one fallopian tube is removed; in a bilateral salpingectomy, both fallopian tubes are removed.

A salpingectomy can be performed for a number of reasons, including treatment of ectopic pregnancies and infections in the fallopian tubes (salpingitis). Women afflicted with the sexually transmitted diseases gonorrhea, syphilis, and chlamydia are prime candidates for salpingectomy. These conditions are the most common causes of infection of the fallopian tubes. Childbirth, abortion, and insertion of intrauterine devices (IUDs) have also been associated with salpingitis and the salpingectomy procedure.

Women who have only one fallopian tube are still able to conceive.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Reason for Procedure

A unilateral salpingectomy is used to remove a pregnancy in which a fertilized ovum is implanted in a fallopian tube (ectopic pregnancy). Bilateral salpingectomy is used to treat women who have been diagnosed with chronically infected fallopian tubes (salpingitis) and who are not responding to treatment with antibiotics. Surgical removal of the fallopian tubes is also used as partial treatment for some cases of endometriosis and pelvic inflammatory disease. Removal of cysts and excision of an abscess are two other indications for salpingectomy. The procedure is often performed with a hysterectomy or an oophorectomy (surgical removal of one or both ovaries).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



How Procedure is Performed

The salpingectomy procedure is performed in a hospital or outpatient clinic under local or general anesthesia, using one of several methods. Laparoscopy, the most common method, begins with a tiny incision in the abdomen in or near the navel. The surgeon inserts a slender telescope-like instrument, called a laparoscope, through the incision. A second small incision is made just above the pubic hair line, a probe is inserted, and the fallopian tubes are removed.

Another often-used method, the minilaparotomy, requires an incision about 2 inches long in the lower abdomen and does not employ a viewing instrument. The incision provides access for the removal of the fallopian tubes.

A third less common, more invasive method called laparotomy requires an extensive 2- to 5-inch incision in the lower abdomen.

Two other procedures, magnified visual inspection (culdoscopy) and surgical incision in the vagina (colpotomy), facilitate approaching the fallopian tubes through the vagina rather than through the abdomen. Neither of these two procedures is used very often.

Decisions regarding the most appropriate procedural method for a given woman depend on that woman's age, weight, previous lower abdominal surgeries, heart and lung disease history, and other considerations.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Prognosis

The predicted outcome after salpingectomy depends on the purpose of the procedure and the method (laparoscopy, minilaparotomy, or laparotomy).

When the purpose of the procedure is to treat infected fallopian tubes (salpingitis), removal of the fallopian tubes usually leads to a successful outcome—the infection is removed along with the tube. When the purpose of the procedure is to treat endometriosis, removal of a fallopian tube does not usually lead to a successful outcome because the inner lining of the uterus (endometrium) has been growing in other places, such as the ovaries, bladder, intestines, and rectum. If the purpose of the procedure is to treat ectopic pregnancy, in which the ovum implants in a fallopian tube rather than in the uterus, removal of the tube leads to a successful outcome—the planted ovum is removed with the tube.

Generally, most individuals recover completely from any of the three commonly used methods. Individuals treated with the laparoscopic method recover more quickly and have fewer post surgical problems.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation after a salpingectomy is similar to that for many other abdominal and pelvic surgeries. Postoperative breathing exercises may be necessary to prevent pulmonary complications; often a spirometer is used, which measures the force of expiration. Several types of coughing exercises may also be assigned with the same intended goal. Specific exercises to reduce postoperative pain and speed recovery include progressive relaxation and deep-breathing techniques. They should be performed several times a day until the patient is fully ambulatory. Exercises to improve strength and increase circulation are especially valuable during the first 48 hours after surgery and should be performed 3 to 5 times per day.

The final step of the rehabilitation program is to have the individual perform exercises that resemble activities performed in the home and / or workplace. Individuals may continue these exercises for 4 to 6 weeks, until recovery from surgery is complete and pain is no longer noticeable when walking or breathing. The physical therapist may need to make individual modifications, depending on the extent and residual effects of the procedure and the individual's general health.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Complications

As with any procedure performed under general anesthesia, the individual may experience a reaction to the anesthesia drugs and have breathing problems. Some individuals experience complications from the surgery itself, such as bleeding or infection. And on rare occasions, the bowels or vessels may be injured during surgery and may require additional surgical repair.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Ability to Work (Return to Work Considerations)

Extended sick leave may be necessary, depending on whether the procedure was a laparoscopy, minilaparotomy, or laparotomy. If the procedure was laparoscopic, most individuals return to work within a few days. The length of sick leave will be contingent on the age of the woman, surgical complications, and resulting diagnoses and prognoses. Strenuous physical activities, lifting at work, and jobs that require a lot of knee bending should be avoided for several days and may need to be modified temporarily. Allowances may also have to be made for rest periods at work, for shorter work hours, and / or for fewer work days per week.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



References

General

"Laparoscopic Salpingectomy for Ectopic Pregnancy." Laparoscopy.com. 24 May 2005 <http://www.laparoscopy.com/pictures/ectopic.html>.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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