Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Schizophrenia


Related Terms

  • Schizophrenia Disorder
  • Schizophrenic Reaction

Differential Diagnosis

  • Addison's disease
  • ALA dehydratase deficiency porphyria
  • Alcohol-related psychosis
  • Autism spectrum disorder or communication disorders
  • Behçet's disease
  • Bipolar disorder with psychotic or catatonic features
  • Body dysmorphic disorder
  • Brain abscess
  • Brief psychotic disorder
  • Churg-Strauss syndrome
  • Cocaine-related psychiatric disorder
  • Cytomegalovirus (CMV)
  • Delusional disorder
  • Encephalopathy, dialysis
  • Encephalopathy, hepatic
  • Encephalopathy, hypertensive
  • Encephalopathy, uremic
  • Folic acid deficiency
  • Head trauma
  • Huntington's disease dementia
  • Hypercalcemia
  • Hyperparathyroidism
  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Hypocalcemia
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Hypokalemia
  • Hypomagnesemia
  • Hyponatremia
  • Hypoparathyroidism
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Lung cancer, oat cell (small cell)
  • Major depressive disorder with psychotic or catatonic features
  • Mental disorders secondary to general medical conditions
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • Other mental disorders associated with a psychotic episode
  • Paraneoplastic syndromes
  • Phencyclidine (PCP)-related psychiatric disorders
  • Porphyria, acute intermittent
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder
  • Schizoaffective disorder
  • Schizophreniform disorder
  • Schizotypal personality disorder
  • Shared psychotic disorder
  • Substance-induced mood disorder, depressed type
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)
  • Wernicke-Korsakoff's syndrome
  • Wilson's disease

Specialists

  • Clinical Psychologist
  • Psychiatrist

Comorbid Conditions

  • Alcohol use
  • Anxiety disorders
  • Depression
  • Drug dependency
  • Nicotine dependence
  • Obsessive compulsive disorder
  • Panic disorder
  • Paranoid personality disorder
  • Schizotypal personality disorder
  • Stress

Factors Influencing Duration

Negative symptoms (e.g., regressive behavior, emotional flatness, social withdrawal) lengthen disability because they are more difficult to treat than positive symptoms (e.g., hallucinations, delusions, anger, anxiety, violence), and are often accompanied by intellectual impairment. Lack of insight on the part of the affected individual also lengthens disability because such an individual has little incentive to cooperate with treatment and to adhere to a medication regimen. Another negative influence on length of disability is the individual's presence in an unstable or hostile environment. Strength of family and social supports, the quality of the individual’s relationship with his or her psychiatrist, response to treatment, and specific job duties also influence duration of disability.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
295.00 - Schizophrenia, Simple Type; Unspecified
295.01 - Schizophrenia, Simple Type; Subchronic
295.02 - Schizophrenia, Simple Type; Chronic
295.03 - Schizophrenia, Simple Type; Subchronic with Acute Exacerbation
295.04 - Schizophrenia, Simple Type; Chronic with Acute Exacerbation
295.05 - Schizophrenia, Simple Type; in Remission
295.10 - Schizophrenia, Disorganized Type; Unspecified
295.11 - Schizophrenia, Disorganized Type; Subchronic
295.12 - Schizophrenia, Disorganized Type; Chronic
295.13 - Schizophrenia, Disorganized Type; Subchronic with Acute Exacerbation
295.14 - Schizophrenia, Disorganized Type; Chronic with Acute Exacerbation
295.15 - Schizophrenia, Disorganized Type; in Remission
295.20 - Schizophrenia, Catatonic Type; Unspecified
295.21 - Schizophrenia, Catatonic Type; Subchronic
295.22 - Schizophrenia, Catatonic Type; Chronic
295.23 - Schizophrenia, Catatonic Type; Subchronic with Acute Exacerbation
295.24 - Schizophrenia, Catatonic Type; Chronic with Acute Exacerbation
295.25 - Schizophrenia, Catatonic Type; in Remission
295.30 - Schizophrenia, Paranoid Type; Unspecified
295.31 - Schizophrenia, Paranoid Type; Subchronic
295.32 - Schizophrenia, Paranoid Type; Chronic
295.33 - Schizophrenia, Paranoid Type; Subchronic with Acute Exacerbation
295.34 - Schizophrenia, Paranoid Type; Chronic with Acute Exacerbation
295.35 - Schizophrenia, Paranoid Type; in Remission
295.50 - Latent Schizophrenia; Unspecified
295.51 - Latent Schizophrenia; Subchronic
295.52 - Latent Schizophrenia; Chronic
295.53 - Latent Schizophrenia; Subchronic with Acute Exacerbation
295.54 - Latent Schizophrenia; Chronic with Acute Exacerbation
295.55 - Latent Schizophrenia; in Remission
295.60 - Schizophrenia, Residual Type; Unspecified
295.61 - Schizophrenia, Residual Type; Subchronic
295.62 - Schizophrenia, Residual Type; Chronic
295.63 - Schizophrenia, Residual Type; Subchronic with Acute Exacerbation
295.64 - Schizophrenia, Residual Type; Chronic with Acute Exacerbation
295.65 - Schizophrenia, Residual Type; in Remission
295.80 - Types of Schizophrenia, Other Specified; Unspecified
295.81 - Types of Schizophrenia, Other Specified; Subchronic
295.82 - Types of Schizophrenia, Other Specified; Chronic
295.83 - Types of Schizophrenia, Other Specified; Subchronic with Acute Exacerbation
295.84 - Types of Schizophrenia, Other Specified; Chronic with Acute Exacerbation
295.90 - Schizophrenia, Unspecified; Unspecified
295.91 - Schizophrenia, Unspecified; Subchronic
295.92 - Schizophrenia, Unspecified; Chronic
295.93 - Schizophrenia, Unspecified; Subchronic with Acute Exacerbation
295.94 - Schizophrenia, Unspecified; Chronic with Acute Exacerbation
295.95 - Schizophrenia, Unspecified; in Remission

Ability to Work (Return to Work Considerations)

An individual with schizophrenia returning to work would benefit from a schedule that incorporates flex-time or a part-time position, time off for scheduled medical appointments, flexible break times that meet the individual's needs rather than following a fixed schedule, a workspace where visual and auditory distractions are minimized, and additional leave after a hospitalization. Individuals would also benefit from the opportunity to phone professionals during the workday, and to meet regularly with the employer, supervisor, and job coach.

Risk: There may be a risk to coworkers if individuals with schizophrenia exhibit positive symptoms such as paranoia, anger, anxiety, hallucinations, or violence. Because schizophrenia is associated with an increased risk of suicide and drug and alcohol addiction, adequate supervision should be provided to maintain workplace safety. Recurrence may be mitigated by compliance with prescribed medications during the course of the disease.

Capacity: Capacity is dependent on the severity and expression of psychotic symptoms, both positive and negative. Simple work tasks that are not safety-sensitive may be appropriate. Individuals taking prescribed conventional or atypical antipsychotic drugs to control their symptoms may require periodic drug testing to ensure that substance abuse does not become a problem.

Tolerance: Tolerance factors depend on the long-term regular attendance of individual and group psychotherapy sessions, whether the individual is stable or gradually declining in function, and whether the individual taking conventional antipsychotic drugs experiences significant side effects.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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