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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Sciatica


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Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
722.10 - Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Displacement without Myelopathy; Lumbago or Sciatica Due to Displacement of Intervertebral Disc; Neuritis or Radiculitis Due to Displacement or Rupture of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc
724.3 - Sciatica; Neuralgia or Neuritis of Sciatica Nerve

Related Terms

  • Lumbar Radiculopathy
  • Neuritis of the Sciatic Nerve
  • Radiculopathy
  • Sciatic Neuritis
  • Wallet Sciatica

Overview

Sciatica is not a disease, but a symptom of pain in the distribution of a lumbar or sacral nerve root.

The sciatic nerve is the largest nerve in the body, running from the low back (lumbar and sacral region) through many smaller branches to the foot. Sciatica is characterized by pain, numbness, and / or tingling in a dermatomal distribution, and muscle weakness along the course of the nerve. Sciatica involves the sensory nerves, which cause pain and changes in sensation (paresthesia), and can also affect the nerves that control the muscles (motor nerves) in the back of the thigh and in the lower leg and foot. Sciatica may present as leg pain referred from the low back (radiculopathy), but may also occur in individuals with no evidence of nerve root or peripheral nerve compression, disease, or dysfunction. Pain may be present in the low back and buttock area as well.

The most common cause of sciatica is pressure on one of the nerve roots by a herniated lumbar disc, typically at levels L4 or L5, found in about 40% of these cases (Hu). Sacral nerves S1, S2, or S3 may also be affected. Other causes of sciatica include narrowed spaces around the lower spinal nerve roots (spinal stenosis); direct injury to the nerve from a fall (nerve contusion); fracture of the pelvis; dislocation of the hip (nerve stretch injury); a wound; pressure from tight muscles in the hip and buttock region (piriformis syndrome); or direct compression of the sciatic nerve from pregnancy, from a tumor, or by prolonged sitting on external objects such as a wallet. Any disease that results in changes in the low back (lumbosacral spine) or in the nerve may cause sciatica. Conditions that affect the peripheral nerves, such as diabetes, may also cause sciatica.

For specific information on probable disability durations, please refer to topics related to lower back problems, particularly Displacement, Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Without Myelopathy.

Incidence and Prevalence: Sciatica is present in 1% to 10% of the general population (Baldwin). Piriformis syndrome is thought to account for approximately 6% of all cases of sciatica (Klein).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



References

Cited

Baldwin, Jere F., and Jeffrey Horwitz. "Lumbar (Intervertebral) Disk Disorders." eMedicine. Eds. Mark Slabinski, et al. 28 Jan. 2009. Medscape. 3 Jul. 2009 <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/827016-overview>.

Klein, Milton J. "Piriformis Syndrome." eMedicine. Eds. Rajesh R. Yadav, et al. 6 Nov. 2008. Medscape. 3 Jul. 2009 <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/308798-overview>.

General

Hu, Sarina, et al. "Disorders, Diseases, and Injuries of the Spine." Current Diagnosis and Treatment in Orthopedics. Ed. Harry Skinner. 4th ed. New York City: McGraw-Hill, 2006. 244-252.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor