Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Scleroderma


Related Terms

  • Dermatosclerosis
  • Linear Scleroderma
  • Localized Scleroderma
  • Morphea
  • Progressive Systemic Sclerosis

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Dermatologist
  • Gastroenterologist
  • Immunologist
  • Nephrologist
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Physical Therapist
  • Pulmonologist
  • Rheumatologist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

The length of disability may be influenced by age, disease progression, type of disease (localized or systemic), severity of symptoms, whether or not the individual is in a remission period, the individual's mental health, and job requirements.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
701.0 - Circumscribed Scleroderma; Addisons Keloid; Dermatosclerosis, Localized; Lichen Sclerosus Et Atrophicus; Morphea
710 - Diffuse Diseases of Connective Tissue
710.1 - Diffuse Diseases of Connective Tissue, Systemic Scleroses; Acrosclerosis; CRST Syndrome; Progressive Systemic Sclerosis; Scleroderma
710.9 - Diffuse Diseases of Connective Tissue, Unspecified

Diagnosis

History: The symptoms and signs of localized scleroderma are tightening and hardening of the skin, particularly on the arms, face, or hands, resulting in a loss of flexibility. These areas may also show changes in pigmentation. The individual may report swollen hands and feet (edema), particularly in the morning. Joint pain and stiffness may occur.

Symptoms and signs of systemic scleroderma include those of localized scleroderma. Most individuals complain of cold, numb fingers in response to cold environments, the symptom being caused by spasm of the blood vessels (Raynaud's phenomenon). Muscle and joint pains, fever, and muscle weakness are common. Individuals may report heartburn (gastroesophageal reflux), difficulty swallowing (dysphagia), regurgitation of food, and impaired speech (dysarthria). The individual with gastrointestinal involvement may report dry mouth, weight loss (anorexia), nausea, vomiting, bloating, diarrhea, and constipation. Individuals with advanced scleroderma may report a dry cough, chest pain, or shortness of breath.

Physical exam: Scleroderma can be difficult to diagnose because it is uncommon and may resemble other diseases at the beginning (e.g., lupus, rheumatoid arthritis). Skin changes are the hallmark of scleroderma. Thickened, hardened, shiny skin that has lost its normal texture and folds, changes in skin pigmentation, dilated blood vessels (telangiectasia) on the face and hands, and ulcers on the fingertips may be apparent. The joints of the fingers may become fixed and show decreased range of motion. Heart and lung problems may be detected. A grating sound (tendon friction rubs) may be heard or felt as inflamed tissues move over one another at the fingers, wrists, elbows, shoulders, knees, and ankles.

Tests: Blood tests for antibodies directed against parts of the cells in an individual’s body (antinuclear antibodies [ANA], anticentromere, and others) may show a pattern consistent with scleroderma. These tests are not helpful in monitoring disease activity. A sample of the affected skin may be removed (biopsy) for analysis. Examination of the junction between the fingernail and the skin under a microscope may reveal fewer small blood vessels (capillaries) than usual. Other diagnostic tests depend on affected organ systems. For instance, in systemic scleroderma, endoscopy may be performed for gastrointestinal involvement, electrocardiogram (ECG) or a 24-hour Holter monitor for heart concerns, and pulmonary function tests for lung involvement.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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