Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Seizures


Related Terms

  • Absent Seizures
  • Attacks
  • Convulsions
  • Epilepsy
  • Fits
  • Spells
  • Tonic-clonic Seizures

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Family Physician
  • Internal Medicine Physician
  • Neurologist
  • Neurosurgeon

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Length of disability may be influenced by the individual's response to treatment, frequency of seizures, underlying cause of the seizures, presence of concomitant chronic illness, mental and physical health status, and specific job duties.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
345.2 - Petit Mal Status, Epileptic Absence Status
345.3 - Grand Mal Status
779.0 - Convulsions in Newborn; Fits in Newborn; Seizures in Newborn
780.31 - Febrile Convulsions (Simple), Unspecified; Febrile Seizures NOS
780.39 - Other Convulsions; Convulsive Disorder NOS; Fits NOS, Recurrent Convulsions NOS; Seizure NOS

Diagnosis

History: An accurate description of the events leading up to the seizure should be obtained from the individual and any witnesses. The individual may have no recall of the seizure itself but may be able to describe symptoms of an aura such as distorted, unpleasant perceptions of odor, vision, or time. The individual and / or observers may report chewing movements or smacking of the lips, numbness or tingling of the limbs or face, rapid blinking of the eyes, and twitching of the muscles. Observers may report that the individual stopped all activity and had a blank stare or lost consciousness completely. This may have been accompanied by body stiffening (tonic posturing) and either arrhythmic or rhythmic jerking of the limbs (tonic or clonic movements), possibly resulting in self-injury or tongue biting. Loss of control of bowels and bladder may also have occurred. The seizure may have been followed by postictal confusion, headache, muscle soreness, lethargy, or deep sleep. It is important to obtain a history of prior seizures including frequency, type of seizure, anticonvulsant medications (past and present) as well as the individual’s complete medical history including current and prior illnesses (e.g., migraine headaches, hypertension, transient ischemic attack, stroke, sleep disorders, fainting, vertigo), injuries (especially head trauma), treatment for psychiatric or emotional disorders, medication history, history of drug and / or alcohol use and family history of seizures.

Physical exam: A thorough physical examination is conducted to rule out non-neurologic causes of the seizure Examination immediately after a seizure may reveal lethargy, sleepiness, confusion, headache, muscle soreness, and weakness on one side of the body that later resolves (Todd's postictal paralysis). A careful neurological examination is done to look for focal abnormalities in the brain such as a tumor or a lesion resulting from stroke or cerebral vascular accident (CVA). Physical examination may reveal fever and neck stiffness suggestive of central nervous system (CNS) infection (e.g., meningitis, encephalitis); blood and spinal fluid may be tested to confirm infection.

Tests: History and physical exam may provide clues as to the type of seizure, but confirmation by EEG improves diagnostic accuracy because it can show the location and distribution of abnormal electrical discharges (epileptogenic focus) and help to identify the seizure type. EEG performed with 24 hours if seizure is more sensitive in detecting abnormalities. However, a negative EEG does not rule out the diagnosis of seizure or epilepsy. Various maneuvers (activation procedures) can be used to reproduce abnormal electrical discharges on the EEG that would not be seen otherwise; for example, performing EEG when the individual has been awake for 24 hours or more (sleep-deprived EEG), or during hyperventilation, or while strobe lights are rhythmically flashed before the eyes (photic stimulation). If the EEG is still negative, but clinical seizures are strongly suspected, video EEG monitoring can be done for longer periods by studying the individual for 24 to 72 hours in an epilepsy monitoring unit. A special event monitor placed on the chest and worn for at least 24 to 48 hours during the individual’s daily activities can help identify cardiovascular events that may mimic seizures.

To rule out stroke, brain tumor, cerebral hemorrhage, or other causes of seizures, the brain usually is studied by neuroimaging such as CT and MRI; both may be done since CT alone can miss more subtle brain lesions. Blood chemistries may be done to check for low blood glucose levels, electrolyte levels (i.e., sodium, potassium, chloride, magnesium, calcium) and to identify other biochemical, endocrine or metabolic imbalances that could cause generalized seizures. Drug and alcohol screening may be indicated. Levels of anticonvulsants or other medications may be tested to rule out toxicity or to adjust medication dose for epileptic individuals. A lumbar puncture may be performed if infection is suspected once brain MRI or CT scans have ruled out other possible physiological causes within the brain.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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