Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Siderosis


Related Terms

  • Arc-welder's Disease
  • Siderosis Pneumoconiosis

Differential Diagnosis

  • All other pneumoconioses
  • Antimony pneumoconiosis
  • Baritosis (barium)
  • Stannosis (tin)

Specialists

  • Preventive Medicine Specialist
  • Pulmonologist

Comorbid Conditions

  • Cigarette smoking
  • Other forms of pneumoconiosis

Factors Influencing Duration

Disability is not expected from siderosis.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
503 - Pneumoconiosis Due to Other Inorganic Dust
505 - Pneumoconiosis, Unspecified

Overview

Siderosis is a type of occupational lung disease (pneumoconiosis) caused by the inhalation of dust or fumes containing iron or iron oxide particles. It is most commonly seen in arc welders and is also referred to as arc-welder's disease. Iron dust and fumes are also found in mining, steelmaking, iron or steel rolling, metal polishing industries, and in work with ochre pigments. The inhaled iron particles accumulate in the lungs, and while this collection of iron in the lungs is visible upon x-ray, it is usually not associated with inflammation or altered lung function.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Causation and Known Risk Factors

Individuals must be exposed to dust or fumes containing iron or iron oxide particles to be at risk.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Diagnosis

History: During a visit to the physician for an unrelated reason or from an abnormal x-ray, a history of repeated or prolonged exposure to iron or iron oxide dust or fumes will be disclosed.

Physical exam: Physical signs are rare. Abnormal breath sounds may be noted in rare cases.

Tests: Chest x-rays may reveal a net-like (reticular) pattern or, in more severe cases, the presence of small opaque areas (micronodules). Pulmonary function tests (PFT) to evaluate lung volume, capacity, gaseous diffusion, and distribution are usually normal. Spirometry will be used to detect any restriction of normal lung expansion or obstruction of air flow. A peak flow meter will detect narrowing of the airways. Analysis of a sputum sample will reveal the presence of alveolar macrophages (a type of immune cell) containing non-hemoglobin iron (siderocytes). Arterial blood gases (ABG) will be done to assess the efficiency of oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange (gas exchange) in the lungs and the efficiency of gas absorption into the blood, ensuring that oxygen content in the blood is adequate.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Treatment

Siderosis is preventable but not treatable. Because it does not normally cause any symptoms or damage to body tissues, treatment is not required. Avoiding exposure to iron dust or fumes will prevent any further accumulation of particles in the lungs.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Prognosis

Siderosis is a harmless (benign) disease. Most cases never produce symptoms of illness. In rare cases where lung damage does occur, avoiding further exposure to iron dust or fumes prevents progressive damage.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Complications

Complications do not generally occur.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Ability to Work (Return to Work Considerations)

Because siderosis does not usually cause any symptoms or tissue injury, work restrictions and/or accommodations are not generally required. Protective clothing, masks, and equipment may be helpful in reducing exposure.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Failure to Recover

If an individual fails to recover within the expected maximum duration period, the reader may wish to consider the following questions to better understand the specifics of an individual's medical case.

Regarding diagnosis:

  • Has the diagnosis of siderosis been confirmed?
  • Have other lung diseases, such as stannosis (tin), baritosis (barium), and antimony pneumoconiosis been ruled out?
  • Has individual been exposed to other occupational air contaminants?
  • Does individual have an underlying condition that may impact recovery?
  • Is individual a tobacco smoker?

Regarding treatment:

  • Has individual been provided with protective clothing, mask, and equipment to reduce further exposure?
  • Has individual been advised to stop smoking?
  • Would enrollment in a community smoking cessation program be beneficial?

Regarding prognosis:

  • Has individual been provided with protective clothing, mask, and equipment to reduce further exposure when lung damage has occurred?
  • If lung damage has occurred, has individual been advised to stop smoking?

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



References

General

Morgan, W. K.C. "Occupational Lung Disease." Merck Manual of Medical Information. Eds. Mark H. Beers, et al. 2nd Home Online ed. New York: Pocket Books, 1997. 195-201.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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