Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Skin Graft


Related Terms

  • Allograft
  • Autograft
  • Full-thickness Skin Graft
  • Pedicle Graft
  • Split-thickness Graft

Specialists

  • Plastic Surgeon

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

The length of disability will be influenced by the location and size of the damaged tissue area, the cause and severity of the wound, the extent of the surgery, and whether the individual is also the donor of the skin graft.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
86.60 - Skin Graft, Free, Not Otherwise Specified
86.61 - Skin Graft, Full-thickness to Hand
86.62 - Skin Graft to Hand, Other
86.63 - Skin Graft, Full-thickness to Other Sites
86.69 - Skin Graft to Other Sites

Overview

A skin graft is a procedure in which healthy skin is removed (harvested) and transferred to another area of the body, where the skin has been severely damaged by burns, injury, or surgery. New cells grow from the graft, covering the damaged area with fresh skin.

Skin grafts are categorized by the thickness of the donor tissue and the source of the graft. Partial or split-thickness skin grafts (STSGs) contain the outer layer of skin (epidermis) and some but not all of the second layer of skin (dermis), whereas full-thickness skin grafts (FTSGs) contain epidermis, dermis, and various amounts of tissue beneath the skin (subcutaneous tissue).

Split-thickness skin grafts, in which less than the full thickness of skin is removed from the donor site, are used when large areas need to be covered, such as after burns. The donor sites are left to regrow (regenerate), which they do in only a few days. These sites can be harvested repeatedly. Full-thickness grafts are usually preferred for the face because they more closely resemble the appearance of normal skin. These donor sites, however, are limited, must be sutured closed, and cannot be reharvested. In a pedicle flap graft, skin from an area near the wound is loosened and pressed over onto the damaged tissues. This technique allows one side of the grafted skin to remain attached to its original site, receiving its own blood supply.

Skin grafts can also be categorized by the source of donor tissue. Autografts are taken from the individual receiving the graft, whereas allografts are donated from another person. In either case, if outer skin (epidermis) is allowed to grow in culture to create an increased amount of donor tissue, it is called a cultured autograft or allograft.

The type of skin graft depends on the repair needed and the available blood supply of the damaged area. Skin from an identical twin often makes a successful graft. Skin donated from another person or animal provides a useful temporary cover but may be eventually rejected by the recipient's body.

Skin grafting is used to cover a wide variety of wounds that cannot be suitably closed surgically. Such wounds arise in a broad population and in all age groups, for a variety of reasons.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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