Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Spondylitis


Related Terms

  • Ankylosing Spondylitis
  • Psoriatic Arthritis
  • Pyogenic Spondylitis
  • Reiter's Syndrome
  • Rheumatoid Spondylitis

Specialists

  • Family Physician
  • Orthopedic (Orthopaedic) Surgeon
  • Physiatrist (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist)
  • Rheumatologist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Factors influencing length of disability include underlying cause, specific diagnosis, region of the spine and total amount of the spine involved, severity of disease at diagnosis, length of time between development of symptoms and diagnosis, individual’s response to treatment, presence of underlying medical conditions, intravenous (IV) drug abuse, and complications.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
720.0 - Ankylosing Spondylitis
720.8 - Other Inflammatory Spondylopathies
720.9 - Unspecified Inflammatory Spondylopathy; Spondylitis NOS
721.6 - Ankylosing Vertebral Hyperostosis
721.7 - Traumatic Spondylopathy; Kummells Disease or Spondylitis
721.9 - Spondylosis of Unspecified Site
721.90 - Spondylosis of Unspecified Site without Mention of Myelopathy; Arthritis (Deformans) (Degenerative) (Hypertrophic); Osteoarthritis NOS; Spondylarthrosis NOS

Overview

Spondylitis is an inflammation of the facet joints between the vertebrae. It may be either infectious or noninfectious in origin and is a feature of several conditions described as spondyloarthropathies, including ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, reactive arthritis, and arthritis secondary to inflammatory bowel disease (i.e., Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis). In addition to inflammation of vertebral joints, these diseases involve some degree of arthropathy, presenting symptoms of arthritis such as pain, swelling, and stiffness of peripheral joints. Most individuals who have these conditions test positive for the human leukocyte antigen HLA-B27, suggesting a genetic origin. This group of spondyloarthropathies are also thought to be autoimmune diseases, but they are seronegative for rheumatoid factor (RF), which is diagnostic for autoimmune rheumatoid arthritis, the most common form of inflammatory arthritis.

Spondylitis resulting from an immune response to infection in another part of the body, as in Reiter’s syndrome, should not be confused with primary infection of bone in the spine (osteomyelitis) or infection of a spinal disc (discitis).

Ankylosing spondylitis is a specific type of spondylitis, characterized by inflammation of the vertebral joints and the joints between the spine and pelvis (sacroiliac joints). Fixed deformity of the spine in the sagittal plane may occur.

Psoriatic arthritis occurs in some individuals with psoriasis, a chronic skin condition. About 1 in 20 individuals with psoriasis will develop symptoms of arthritis along with the skin condition. In general, individuals who have psoriasis have a higher prevalence of arthritis than the general population. The cause of psoriatic arthritis is not known, but genetic factors may play a role.

Reiter's syndrome is an inflammatory complication of previous infection elsewhere in the body. Its symptoms include inflammation of the urethra (urethritis), inflammation of the eye (conjunctivitis), skin lesions, and reactive arthritis.

Undifferentiated spondylitis, not associated with an underlying spondyloarthropathy, is a term used by some physicians to describe back pain of unknown etiology associated with degenerative changes on imaging studies.

Incidence and Prevalence: The exact incidence of spondylitis is not known because it is a feature of a group of diseases. In the US, 0.21% of individuals over the age of 15 are affected by ankylosing spondylitis (Clowse). The prevalence of ankylosing spondylitis in the US is estimated to be 197 individuals in 100,000, which closely parallels the frequency of HLA-B27 (Van der Linden). The incidence rate for Reiter's syndrome is 3.5 individuals per 100,000 in the US and correlates with the incidence rate of urethritis/cervicitis and infectious diarrhea (dysentery) (Scoggins).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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