Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Sprains and Strains, Ankle


Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
727.67 - Rupture of Tendon, Nontraumatic, Achilles Tendon
845.00 - Sprains and Strains, Ankle, Unspecified Site
845.01 - Sprains and Strains, Ankle, Deltoid (Ligament) Ankle; Internal Collateral (Ligament) Ankle
845.02 - Sprains and Strains, Ankle, Calcaneofibular Ligament
845.03 - Sprains and Strains, Ankle, Tibiofibular Ligament, Distal
845.09 - Sprains and Strains, Ankle, Other; Achilles Tendon

Diagnosis

History: Individuals with a first-degree sprain or strain may not experience any symptoms until a day or so after injury, although these injuries do commonly cause mild immediate pain. Those with a second- or third-degree strain or sprain will describe an injury with a twisting of the ankle and often an audible "pop." Pain and swelling immediately after the injury are more common after a second- or third-degree injury.

Individuals are most often unable to tolerate any weight bearing on the ankle. Pain over the lower leg, just above the ankle, is more common with a syndesmosis injury. A history of previous injuries should be obtained, even if no treatment was sought, as a previous injury could make the ankle unstable and more susceptible to repeat injury.

Physical exam: Local or diffuse swelling and bruising (ecchymosis) is noted. Pain may be localized to the ligaments involved or, more generally, over the lateral, medial, or anterior portion of the ankle. Manual stress of the ligaments may reveal looseness (laxity) of the ankle joint and increased pain. Stress testing of the other ankle is done for comparison (a ruptured ankle ligament will cause the injured ankle to be looser, or more lax, than the uninjured ankle).

Tests: Routine x-rays are done whenever swelling and tenderness are present to rule out damage to the bones, especially avulsion fractures. Special x-rays (stress views) will allow evaluation of ligament stability by taking the x-ray while the anesthetized ankle is manually stressed. Stress views of the contralateral ankle are taken for comparison. The spaces between the talus and fibula (or tibia) are measured and compared between the two ankles, with an increased space indicating instability. In addition, the angle of "tilt" between the top surface of the talus and the bottom surfaces of the tibia and fibula (talar tilt) is measured in both ankles and compared, with an increase in talar tilt indicative of instability. A CT scan may be ordered if avulsion fractures or talar dome fractures are suspected. Arthrography to detect ligament and joint capsule tears is useful only in the first 5 to 7 days after injury, after which blood clotting will seal these defects. MRIs are useful for planning surgical reconstruction of ligaments.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor