Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Sprains and Strains, Knee


Related Terms

  • ACL Tear
  • LCL Tear
  • MCL Tear
  • PCL Tear
  • Sprained Knee

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Orthopedic (Orthopaedic) Surgeon
  • Physiatrist (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist)
  • Physical Therapist
  • Sports Medicine Physician

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Duration will depend on the extent of the injury, type of therapy used, effectiveness of treatment, presence of concomitant injuries, complications, age, co-morbidities (injuries to other parts of the limb, injuries to the other lower limb, systemic disease), and job requirements.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
844 - Sprains and Strains of Knee and Leg
844.0 - Sprains and Strains of Knee and Leg, Lateral Collateral Ligament of Knee
844.1 - Sprains and Strains of Knee and Leg, Medial Collateral Ligament of Knee
844.2 - Sprains and Strains of Knee and Leg, Cruciate Ligament of Knee
844.3 - Sprains and Strains of Knee and Leg, Tibiofibular (Joint) (Ligament), Superior
844.8 - Sprains and Strains of Knee and Leg, Other Specified Site
844.9 - Sprains and Strains of Knee and Leg, Unspecified Site; Knee NOS; Leg NOS

Prognosis

Isolated injuries to the collateral ligaments, even third-degree injuries, generally heal well with non-operative treatment. Third-degree collateral ligament sprains associated with other ligament or meniscus damage often require surgery, but generally will heal well. Recovery can be expected when first and second-degree sprains of ACL and PCL are treated with physical therapy and activity alteration. Second degree cruciate sprains may be “protected” with a brace for instability to be worn during heavy activity that risks reinjury. Third-degree sprains of ACL that are surgically repaired, with either primary repair or reconstruction with augmentation, require an extensive rehabilitation after surgery, but recovery can be expected. Surgery to treat third-degree injuries to PCL is rarely performed on middle-aged or older adults unless there is gross instability or associated injuries, especially of the meniscus. Individuals undergoing this surgery require an extensive rehabilitation afterwards, but recovery can be expected.

Full recovery from strains can be expected after physical therapy for first and second-degree injuries. Third-degree strains and sprains will require several months for full recovery. Return to limited activity may be expected early in treatment, with an interruption for surgery and eventual return to full activity. Knee braces are often used for all levels of sprains and strains, sometimes only in the early stages of recovery, and often for several months after surgery. Protective braces may be required after recovery to prevent re-injury.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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