Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Syncope


Related Terms

  • Blackout
  • Fainting
  • Transient Loss of Consciousness

Differential Diagnosis

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

If syncope is due to an underlying cause, the specific diagnosis may influence the length of disability. An individual's job requirements may also determine the length or degree of disability. Age and mental health of the individual may also influence the length of disability.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
780.2 - Syncope and Collapse; Blackout, Fainting; (Near) (Pre)syncope; Vasovagal Attack

Treatment

Recovery from syncope occurs as soon as normal blood flow is restored to the brain. The individual should be lying down with the legs elevated for 10 to 15 minutes after regaining consciousness to prevent another attack.

If the individual does not regain consciousness within a minute or 2, medical help should be obtained promptly. Emergency care should include protection of the airway and of circulation, and intravenous medications or oxygen may be needed.

Recurrent syncope needs to be evaluated to rule out a more serious underlying condition. Individuals who have had episodes of syncope in the past should be instructed to watch for the warning signs of fainting, such as lightheadedness, dizziness, and nausea. When they experience these warning signs, they should lie down or put their heads between their knees. They should also be careful not to get up suddenly or to remain standing for long periods of time and should avoid situations or activities that tend to bring on their syncopal attacks.

Syncope originating in the heart may require treatment with anti-arrhythmic drugs, beta-blockers, or a pacemaker. Syncope related to disease of the heart valves may require valve replacement.

If the individual has orthostatic syncope, the head of the bed should be raised; the individual may also benefit from compression stockings (thrombo-embolism deterrent [TED] hose), steroids and alpha-1 antagonist. Neurologic syncope is treated the same as orthostatic syncope. If the individual has situational syncope, hydration is important, but later in the course of their illness, they may need a pacemaker.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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