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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Thoracic Disc Disorder with Myelopathy


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Overview

Image Description:
Thoracic Disc Disorder - The head and torso are shown in profile, emphasizing the thoracic spine of the upper back. Two close-ups of the thoracic spine reveal: 1) the normal spine with spinal cord and spinal nerve, and 2) a herniated thoracic disc pressing on the nerve. Two cross-sections of the spinal column show the relative positions of the spinal cord and the nerve, contrasting a normal spine and the spine with displaced disc and impingement of the nerve.
Click to see Image

Thoracic disc disorder with myelopathy involves bulging or displacement of discs between the vertebrae of the thoracic spine (thoracic intervertebral disc herniation) with accompanying spinal cord compression. Myelopathy is an inclusive term referring to any disease of the spinal canal. The thoracic region specifies the middle portion of the spine. The following are examples of myelopathy: carcinomatous myelopathy (spinal cord degeneration associated with cancer); compressive myelopathy (spinal cord changes from the pressure of hematomas or masses); and radiation myelopathy (spinal cord destruction from radiation sources such as x-ray therapy). When the spinal cord destruction is caused as a complication of disease, the specific myelopathy signifies that origin; for example, diabetic myelopathy. Myelopathy describes the clinical findings associated with compression of the spinal cord that results in impairment of nerve function and may cause partial or complete paralysis of the lower extremities (paraplegia), with impairment of bowel and bladder function.

Thoracic disc herniations are uncommon as a cause of spinal cord compression causing myelopathy. Disc herniation in the thoracic spine accounts for less than 1% of all symptomatic disc herniations (Malanga). Most symptomatic thoracic disc herniations occur in the lower thoracic region, with 75% occurring in the lower four disc levels of the thoracic spine (T8-T12) (Vollmer). Approximately 80% of cases occur without a history of trauma and are due to degenerative changes, including disc calcification or ligament ossification (Malanga).

Incidence and Prevalence: The incidence of thoracic disc injuries is 1 in 1 million individuals annually, accounting for 0.25% to 0.75% of all herniated discs (Hannani).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor